Tag Archive: Thriller


It’s late, but I’m excited to share what I got for Christmas. I’m proud to say that I didn’t buy any of these, so I’m keeping to my book buying ban. Chad actually bought all of these books and movies for me. He’s too good to me.

I also received some book and movie related goodies such as an Edgar Allen Poe candle, “The Raven” figurine and poem, and The Nightmare Before Christmas Yahtzee. This Christmas was amazing all around, and I loved everything I got. Let me know in the comments some of the stuff you received or even something you gave someone else. If you’ve made a similar post, you can leave a link in the comments. I love looking at book, movie, or video game hauls.

*All descriptions for books taken from Goodreads and all descriptions for movies taken from IMDb. All pictures link to their respective Goodreads or IMDb pages.

mistbornMistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson
Genre – Fantasy

(The Final Empire) In a world where ash falls from the sky, and mist dominates the night, an evil cloaks the land and stifles all life. The future of the empire rests on the shoulders of a troublemaker and his young apprentice. Together, can they fill the world with color once more?

In Brandon Sanderson’s intriguing tale of love, loss, despair and hope, a new kind of magic enters the stage – Allomancy, a magic of the metals.

 

Fight Club – Chuck Palahniuk
Genre – Fiction/Thriller

The first rule about fight club is you don’t talk about fight club.

In his debut novel, Chuck Palahniuk showed himself to be his generation’s most visionary satirist. Fight Club’s estranged narrator leaves his lackluster job when he comes under the thrall of Tyler Durden, an enigmatic young man who holds secret boxing matches in the basement of bars. There two men fight “as long as they have to.” A gloriously original work that exposes what is at the core of our modern world.

 

Un Lun Dun – China Miéville
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

What is Un Lun Dun?

It is London through the looking glass, an urban Wonderland of strange delights where all the lost and broken things of London end up . . . and some of its lost and broken people, too–including Brokkenbroll, boss of the broken umbrellas; Obaday Fing, a tailor whose head is an enormous pin-cushion, and an empty milk carton called Curdle. Un Lun Dun is a place where words are alive, a jungle lurks behind the door of an ordinary house, carnivorous giraffes stalk the streets, and a dark cloud dreams of burning the world. It is a city awaiting its hero, whose coming was prophesied long ago, set down for all time in the pages of a talking book.

When twelve-year-old Zanna and her friend Deeba find a secret entrance leading out of London and into this strange city, it seems that the ancient prophecy is coming true at last. But then things begin to go shockingly wrong.

 

American Supernatural Tales – S.T. Joshi (Editor)
Genre – Anthologies/Horror

The ultimate collection of weird and frightening American fiction. As Stephen King will attest, the popularity of the occult in American literature has only grown since the days of Edgar Allan Poe. American Supernatural Tales celebrates the richness of this tradition with chilling contributions from some of the nation’s brightest literary lights, including Poe himself, H. P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Ray Bradbury, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and-of course- Stephen King. By turns phantasmagoric, spectral, and demonic, this is a frighteningly good addition to Penguin Classics.

 


 

The Shining
Rating – R

A family heads to an isolated hotel for the winter where an evil and spiritual presence influences the father into violence, while his psychic son sees horrific forebodings from the past and of the future.

 

 

 

 

Road to Ninja: Naruto the Movie
Rating – TV-14

Naruto and Sakura are captured in a parallel world by Madara, who’s intentions are to steal the jinchuuriki from Naruto.

 

 

 

 

 

Finding Nemo
Genre – G

After his son is captured in the Great Barrier Reef and taken to Sydney, a timid clownfish sets out on a journey to bring him home.

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October 2014 Book Haul

Bookoutlet strikes again! I did make it a whole month and a half without buying any books, but I’m sure this haul made up for it. I got everything from Bookoutlet except for the last three books which I got at the book fair. Let me know if you’ve read any of these and what you thought or if you want to read any of them.

*All descriptions taken from Goodreads, and all pictures link to their respective Goodreads pages.

The Winner’s Curse – Marie Rutkoski
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Winning what you want may cost you everything you love

As a general’s daughter in a vast empire that revels in war and enslaves those it conquers, seventeen-year-old Kestrel has two choices: she can join the military or get married. But Kestrel has other intentions.

One day, she is startled to find a kindred spirit in a young slave up for auction. Arin’s eyes seem to defy everything and everyone. Following her instinct, Kestrel buys him—with unexpected consequences. It’s not long before she has to hide her growing love for Arin.

But he, too, has a secret, and Kestrel quickly learns that the price she paid for a fellow human is much higher than she ever could have imagined.

 

Split Second – Kasie West
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Life can change in a split second.

Addie hardly recognizes her life since her parents divorced. Her boyfriend used her. Her best friend betrayed her. She can’t believe this is the future she chose. On top of that, her ability is acting up. She’s always been able to Search the future when presented with a choice. Now she can manipulate and slow down time, too . . . but not without a price.

When Addie’s dad invites her to spend her winter break with him, she jumps at the chance to escape into the Norm world of Dallas, Texas. There she meets the handsome and achingly familiar Trevor. He’s a virtual stranger to her, so why does her heart do a funny flip every time she sees him? But after witnessing secrets that were supposed to stay hidden, Trevor quickly seems more suspicious of Addie than interested in her. And she has an inexplicable desire to change that.

Meanwhile, her best friend, Laila, has a secret of her own: she can restore Addie’s memories . . . once she learns how. But there are powerful people who don’t want to see this happen. Desperate, Laila tries to manipulate Connor, a brooding bad boy from school—but he seems to be the only boy in the Compound immune to her charms. And the only one who can help her.

As Addie and Laila frantically attempt to retrieve the lost memories, Addie must piece together a world she thought she knew before she loses the love she nearly forgot . . . and a future that could change everything.

 

Cruel Beauty – Rosamund Hodge
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Graceling meets Beauty and the Beast in this sweeping fantasy about one girl’s journey to fulfill her destiny and the monster who gets in her way-by stealing her heart.

Based on the classic fairy tale Beauty and the Beast, Cruel Beauty is a dazzling love story about our deepest desires and their power to change our destiny.

Since birth, Nyx has been betrothed to the evil ruler of her kingdom-all because of a foolish bargain struck by her father. And since birth, she has been in training to kill him.

With no choice but to fulfill her duty, Nyx resents her family for never trying to save her and hates herself for wanting to escape her fate. Still, on her seventeenth birthday, Nyx abandons everything she’s ever known to marry the all-powerful, immortal Ignifex. Her plan? Seduce him, destroy his enchanted castle, and break the nine-hundred-year-old curse he put on her people.

But Ignifex is not at all what Nyx expected. The strangely charming lord beguiles her, and his castle-a shifting maze of magical rooms-enthralls her.

As Nyx searches for a way to free her homeland by uncovering Ignifex’s secrets, she finds herself unwillingly drawn to him. Even if she could bring herself to love her sworn enemy, how can she refuse her duty to kill him? With time running out, Nyx must decide what is more important: the future of her kingdom, or the man she was never supposed to love.

 

The Hiding Place – David J. Bell
Genre – Mystery

Sometimes it’s easier to believe a lie.

Twenty-five-years ago, the disappearance of four-year-old Justin Manning rocked the small town of Dove Point, Ohio. After his body was found in a shallow grave in the woods two months later, the repercussions were felt for years.

Janet Manning has been haunted by the murder since the day she lost sight of her brother in the park. Now, with the twenty-fifth anniversary of Justin’s death looming, a detective and a newspaper reporter have started to ask questions, opening old wounds and raising new suspicions. Could the man convicted of the murder — who spent more than two decades in prison — really be innocent? Janet’s childhood friend and high school crush, who was in the park with her that day, has returned to Dove Point, where he is wrestling with his own conflicted memories of the events. And a strange man appears at Janet’s door in the middle of the night, claiming to know the truth.

Soon, years of deceit will be swept away, and the truth about what happened to Janet’s brother will be revealed. And the answers that Janet has sought may be found much closer to home than she ever could have imagined.

 

The Killing Hour – Paul Cleave
Genre – Thriller

“They come for me as I sleep. Their pale faces stare at me, their soft voices tell me to wake, to wake. They come to remind me of the night, to remind me of what I have done.”

Only Charlie doesn’t know what he has done. His shorts are covered in blood, there’s a bump on his forehead and on the news it says the two young women he was with the night before were brutally murdered. Charlie knows Cyris is the murderer – except the police don’t believe Cyris exists. Nor does Jo, Charlie’s ex-wife, to whom he goes for help. He desperately wants her to believe in him, and when she doesn’t, he knows he must force her. As Charlie goes on the run with Jo bound and gagged in the car boot, he tries to figure out whether Cyris is real or imagined, while the killing hour approaches yet again…

As gripping as his first powerful novel, THE CLEANER, this fantastic story keeps you guessing until the last page.

 

Friends with Boys – Faith Erin Hicks
Genre – Graphic Novel/Young Adult

After years of homeschooling, Maggie is starting high school. It’s pretty terrifying.

Maggie’s big brothers are there to watch her back, but ever since Mom left it just hasn’t been the same.

Besides her brothers, Maggie’s never had any real friends before. Lucy and Alistair don’t have lots of friends either. But they eat lunch with her at school and bring her along on their small-town adventures.

Missing mothers…distant brothers…high school…new friends… It’s a lot to deal with. But there’s just one more thing.

MAGGIE IS HAUNTED.

 

Don’t Turn Around – Michelle Gagnon
Genre – Young Adult/Mystery

In Michelle Gagnon’s debut YA thriller, Don’t Turn Around, computer hacker Noa Torson is as smart, tough, and complex as The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’s Lisbeth Salander.

The first in a trilogy, Don’t Turn Around’s intricate plot and heart-pounding action will leave readers desperate for book two.

Sixteen-year-old Noa has been a victim of the system ever since her parents died. Now living off the grid and trusting no one, she uses her hacking skills to stay anonymous and alone. But when she wakes up on a table in a warehouse with an IV in her arm and no memory of how she got there, Noa starts to wish she had someone on her side.

Enter Peter Gregory. A rich kid and the leader of a hacker alliance, Peter needs people with Noa’s talents on his team. Especially after a shady corporation threatens his life in no uncertain terms. But what Noa and Peter don’t realize is that Noa holds the key to a terrible secret, and there are those who’d stop at nothing to silence her for good.

 

Not a Drop to Drink – Mindy McGinnis
Genre – Young Adult/Science Fiction

Regret was for people with nothing to defend, people who had no water.

Lynn knows every threat to her pond: drought, a snowless winter, coyotes, and, most importantly, people looking for a drink. She makes sure anyone who comes near the pond leaves thirsty, or doesn’t leave at all.

Confident in her own abilities, Lynn has no use for the world beyond the nearby fields and forest. Having a life means dedicating it to survival, and the constant work of gathering wood and water. Having a pond requires the fortitude to protect it, something Mother taught her well during their quiet hours on the rooftop, rifles in hand.

But wisps of smoke on the horizon mean one thing: strangers. The mysterious footprints by the pond, nighttime threats, and gunshots make it all too clear Lynn has exactly what they want, and they won’t stop until they get it….

 

The Bad Beginning – Lemony Snicket
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

In this first book, readers are introduced to the unfortunate Baudelaire children — 14-year-old Violet, 12-year-old Klaus, and their infant sister, Sunny — when they learn they’ve just been orphaned by a terrible house fire.

The executor of the Baudelaire estate — a phlegm-plagued banker named Mr. Poe – sends the children to live with a distant relative: a conniving and dastardly villain named Count Olaf, who has designs on the Baudelaire fortune. Count Olaf uses the children as slave labor, provides horrid accommodations for them, and makes them cook huge meals for him and his acting troupe, a bunch of odd-looking, renegade good-for-nothings. When the children are commandeered to appear in Count Olaf’s new play, they grow suspicious and soon learn that the play is not the innocent performance it seems but rather a scheme cooked up by Olaf to help him gain control of the children’s millions.

All this bad luck does provide for both great fun and great learning opportunities, however. Violet is a budding McGyver whose inventions help the children in their quest, Klaus possesses a great deal of book smarts, and Sunny — whose only real ability is an incredibly strong bite — provides moral support and frequent comedy relief. Then there are the many amusing word definitions, colloquialisms, clichés, hackneyed phrases, and other snippets of language provided by the narrator (a character in his own right) that can’t help but expand readers’ vocabularies. Though the Baudelaire children suffer myriad hardships and setbacks, in the end they do manage to outsmart and expose Olaf’s devious ways. But of course, with luck like theirs, it’s a given that Olaf will escape and return to torment them again some day. If only misery was always this much fun.

 

Saving Francesca – Melina Marchetta
Genre – Young Adult/Contemporary

A compelling story of romance, family, and friendship with humor and heart, perfect for fans of Stephanie Perkins and Lauren Myracle.

Francesca is stuck at St. Sebastian’s, a boys’ school that pretends it’s coed by giving the girls their own bathroom. Her only female companions are an ultra-feminist, a rumored slut, and an impossibly dorky accordion player. The boys are no better, from Thomas, who specializes in musical burping, to Will, the perpetually frowning, smug moron that Francesca can’t seem to stop thinking about.

Then there’s Francesca’s mother, who always thinks she knows what’s best for Francesca—until she is suddenly stricken with acute depression, leaving Francesca lost, alone, and without an inkling of who she really is. Simultaneously humorous, poignant, and impossible to put down, this is the story of a girl who must summon the strength to save her family, her social life and—hardest of all—herself.

 

Wildwood Dancing – Juliet Marillier
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

High in the Transylvanian woods, at the castle Piscul Draculi, live five daughters and their doting father. It’s an idyllic life for Jena, the second eldest, who spends her time exploring the mysterious forest with her constant companion, a most unusual frog. But best by far is the castle’s hidden portal, known only to the sisters. Every Full Moon, they alone can pass through it into the enchanted world of the Other Kingdom. There they dance through the night with the fey creatures of this magical realm.

But their peace is shattered when Father falls ill and must go to the southern parts to recover, for that is when cousin Cezar arrives. Though he’s there to help the girls survive the brutal winter, Jena suspects he has darker motives in store. Meanwhile, Jena’s sister has fallen in love with a dangerous creature of the Other Kingdom—an impossible union it’s up to Jena to stop.

When Cezar’s grip of power begins to tighten, at stake is everything Jena loves: her home, her family, and the Other Kingdom she has come to cherish. To save her world, Jena will be tested in ways she can’t imagine—tests of trust, strength, and true love.

 

The Accidental Mother – Rowan Coleman
Genre – Fiction/Chick Lit.

Sophie and Carrie were childhood best friends, but in the last few years they’ve lost touch. While Carrie chose motherhood in a small town, Sophie is powering up the London career track. She’s a corporate manager poised for her next promotion. Sure, she doesn’t have much time for men, but she has a great shoe collection and a cat who’s never going to let her down.

And then Sophie is told that Carrie has died, with nobody left to care for her two daughters, Bella and Izzy, aged six and three. Their father, who left before Carrie’s death, is nowhere to be found; their grandmother is moving into assisted living. Sophie once promised Carrie she would take care of her children if the worst ever happened…and now that day has come.

Witty, wise, and filled with genuinely powerful emotion, The Accidental Mother is the heartwarming, heartbreaking story of a woman who is woefully under-equipped to be suddenly thrown into motherhood, but who through the eyes of two little girls learns more about loss, commitment, and true love than she had ever realized existed.

 

Danse Macabre – Stephen King
Genre – Horror/Non-Fiction

Stephen King explores the phenomenon of horror in a century of film, television, radio, and literature. Who better than King to investigate what terrifies his fans?

“One of the best books on American popular culture in the late 20th century.” (The Philadelphia Inquirer)

 

 

 

Pretties – Scott Westerfeld
Genre – Young Adult/Science Fiction

Tally has finally become pretty. Now her looks are beyond perfect, her clothes are awesome, her boyfriend is totally hot, and she’s completely popular. It’s everything she’s ever wanted.

But beneath all the fun — the nonstop parties, the high-tech luxury, the total freedom — is a nagging sense that something’s wrong. Something important. Then a message from Tally’s ugly past arrives. Reading it, Tally remembers what’s wrong with pretty life, and the fun stops cold.

Now she has to choose between fighting to forget what she knows and fighting for her life — because the authorities don’t intend to let anyone with this information survive.

 

Vampires: Back in Time to the First Darkness – The Original Stories – Watkins Publishing
Genre – Paranormal/Short Stories

Here come the creatures of the night, in eight timeless tales of horror that have terrified generations and inspired the recent flowering of vampire literature. Discover classics of the genre, such as John Polidori’s The Vampyre (written by Lord Byron’s physician) and Carmilla, the novella that inspired Bram Stoker’s Dracula and provoked a scandal with its lesbian undercurrent. This fascinating collection also features Johann Ludwig Tieck, Sheridan LeFanu, Guy de Maupssant, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (and his beloved detective, Sherlock Holmes), E.F. Benson, and Stoker himself, with “Dracula’s Guest”–believed to be the original first chapter of his novel, excised by the publisher.

 

Dragon’s Keep – Janet Lee Carey
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Far away on Wilde Island, Princess Rosalind is born with a dragon claw where her ring finger should be. To hide this secret, the queen forces her to wear gloves at all times until a cure can be found, and Rosalind can fulfill the prophecy that will restore her family to its rightful throne. But Rosalind’s flaw cannot be separated from her fate. When she is carried off by the dragon, everything she thought she knew falls apart. . . .

 

 

Montmorency’s Revenge – Eleanor Updale
Genre – Young Adult/Historical Fiction

A dark tale of vengeance and madness takes Montmorency on his next crusade….

As Queen Victoria lies dying, Montmorency and his friends are already in mourning, and determined to track down the killers who have wrecked their lives. It’s personal obsession, but Montmorency has public duties too, and when the two collide, he must decide which comes first.
Can he stop Doctor Farcett’s slide into insanity? And how can he teach a new generation to forgive when the lust for revenge is eating away at his own soul?

The fourth Montmorency adventure takes him on a race across the globe with a mission of revenge for the death of his dearest friend Lord George Fox Selwyn.

 

Lies, Knives, and Girls in Red Dresses – Ron Koertge
Genre – Young Adult/Poetry

Yes it’s blue and Yes it tickles and Yes
he’s had a lot of wives
and nobody knows what happened to them

but he’s fun at the party and omigod
that castle!

Once upon a time, a strung-out match girl sold CDs to stoners. Twelve impetuous sisters escaped Daddy’s clutches to jiggle and cavort and wear out their shoes. Bluebeard’s latest wife discovered she’d married a serial killer. And Little Red Riding Hood confessed that she kind of wanted to know what it’s like to be swallowed whole.

You see, Ron Koertge knows what really happened to all those wolves and maidens, ogres and orphans, kings and piglets of fairy tales, and he knows about the Ever After. So come closer–he wants to whisper in your ear.

October TBR

I normally don’t pick books for a full month because I know I change my mind so frequently, but for October I want to have a theme for the entire month. Of course that theme will be horror, and I’m going to have some thrillers and mysteries as well. I’m hoping this will get me out of the reading slump I’ve been in for almost the entire month of September. It’s been awful.

I started off the month strong, but sadly, I wasn’t able to finish Red Rising by Pierce Brown. I wanted to like the book, but I decided to DNF it at 32%. It actually ended up putting me in the reading slump, and I haven’t been able to finish Scarlet by Marissa Meyer, even though I’m really enjoying it. I’ll have it read before the end of September though. I did end up reading Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol and The Surprise Party by R. L. Stine, and I really liked them. They would be a good additions to an October TBR, especially if you want something scary but not too scary.

I’m hoping this theme will help me get out of my reading slump. My TBR could change, depending on how I feel about the books. I mean I might get so scared, I have to sit in a corner and read a happy unicorn book. I’m a pretty big chicken when it comes to horror movies, so let’s see how I do with some horror books. I’ve been wanting to read these books for a while though, so I figure this is a perfect time to do it. Let me know what you’re going to read for October. Anything scary?

*Descriptions taken from Goodreads.

The Shining – Stephen King
Genre – Horror/Thriller

Danny was only five years old but in the words of old Mr Halloran he was a ‘shiner’, aglow with psychic voltage. When his father became caretaker of the Overlook Hotel his visions grew frighteningly out of control.

As winter closed in and blizzards cut them off, the hotel seemed to develop a life of its own. It was meant to be empty, but who was the lady in Room 217, and who were the masked guests going up and down in the elevator? And why did the hedges shaped like animals seem so alive?

Somewhere, somehow there was an evil force in the hotel – and that too had begun to shine…

 

It – Stephen King
Genre – Horror/Thriller

The story follows the exploits of seven children as they are terrorized by an eponymous being, which exploits the fears and phobias of its victims in order to disguise itself while hunting its prey. “It” primarily appears in the form of a clown in order to attract its preferred prey of young children. The novel is told through narratives alternating between two time periods, and is largely told in the third-person omniscient mode. It deals with themes which would eventually become King staples: the power of memory, childhood trauma, and the ugliness lurking behind a façade of traditional small-town values.

 

 

Intensity – Dean Koontz
Genre – Suspense/Thriller

Past midnight, Chyna Shepard, twenty-six, gazes out a moonlit window, unable to sleep on her first night in the Napa Valley home of her best friend’s family. Instinct proves reliable. A murderous sociopath, Edgler Foreman Vess, has entered the house, intent on killing everyone inside. A self-proclaimed “homicidal adventurer,” Vess lives only to satisfy all appetites as they arise, to immerse himself in sensation, to live without fear, remorse or limits, to live with “intensity.” Chyna is trapped in his deadly orbit.

Chyna is a survivor, toughened by a lifelong struggle for safety and self-respect. Now she will be tested as never before. At first her sole aim is to get out alive–until, by chance, she learns the identity of Vess’s next intended victim, a faraway innocent only she can save. Driven by a newly discovered thirst for meaning beyond mere self-preservation, Chyna musters every inner resource she has to save an endangered girl…as moment by moment, the terrifying threat of Edgler Foreman Vess intensifies.

 

The Silence of the Lambs – Thomas Harris
Genre – Horror

There’s a killer on the loose who knows that beauty is only skin deep, and a trainee investigator who’s trying to save her own hide. The only man that can help is locked in an asylum. But he’s willing to put a brave face on – if it will help him escape.

 

 

 

 

Your House Is on Fire, Your Children All Gone – Stefan Kiesbye
Genre – Horror/Short Stories

The village of Hemmersmoor is a place untouched by time and shrouded in superstition: There is the grand manor house whose occupants despise the villagers, the small pub whose regulars talk of revenants, the old mill no one dares to mention. This is where four young friends come of age—in an atmosphere thick with fear and suspicion. Their innocent games soon bring them face-to-face with the village’s darkest secrets in this eerily dispassionate, astonishingly assured novel, evocative of Stephen King’s classic short story “Children of the Corn” and infused with the spirit of the Brothers Grimm.

 

Spirits of the Noh – Thomas Randall
Genre – Young Adult/Horror

Kara Foster is finally starting to fit in at her boarding school in Japan-after all, nothing bonds you with your classmates like having an ancient demon put a curse on you. Hoping life can go back to normal now that the monster has been laid to rest, Kara joins her friends Sakura and Miho in putting on a play for the Noh drama club. It’s the story of the Hannya, a snake demon who inhabits the body of a beautiful woman. When a few members of the Noh club go missing, Kara fears that the real Hannya has been awakened by the curse. Then Miho is abducted, and Kara must find her before the Hannya exacts her terrible revenge. But the demon is wily and may be hidden in the last place anyone would think to look.

 

The Night She Disappeared – April Henry
Genre – Young Adult/Mystery

Gabie drives a Mini Cooper. She also works part time as a delivery girl at Pete’s Pizza. One night, Kayla—another delivery girl—goes missing. To her horror, Gabie learns that the supposed kidnapper had asked if the girl in the Mini Cooper was working that night. Gabie can’t move beyond the fact that Kayla’s fate was really meant for her, and she becomes obsessed with finding Kayla. She teams up with Drew, who also works at Pete’s. Together, they set out to prove that Kayla isn’t dead—and to find her before she is.

Genre: Young Adult

*I received a free copy of this book from the author for an honest review.

Casting Shadows Everywhere by L. T. Vargus is a thriller about a 15 year old boy named Jake. He has low self-esteem and considers himself weak and pathetic. He can’t bring himself to ask his dream girl Beth out on a date, and he is bullied at school. To change his life, he seeks out help from his cousin Nick, a professional burglar.

Nick takes Jake under his wing in an effort to help him become more confident. Unfortunately, Nick’s way of doing that is to break into people’s homes and steal valuables. Besides breaking into homes, Nick teaches Jake about his belief system that nothing is right or wrong. In the beginning, Nick’s ideas aid Jake in overcoming his “weakness” and allow him to stand up to his bullies. However, as time passes, Jake begins to get more aggressive, and he realizes that Nick has done more than just rob people.

This novel really surprised me. It’s written like journal entries without dates. The main character Jake is writing about his experiences with his cousin Nick and his friend Beth while including sections about his dreams and lessons from his psychology class. The writing style is interesting and fits with the tone of the story. Since it’s in Jake’s point of view, the writing can be crude at times, and there is some strong language, but it adds to the realness of the story and makes it believable.

All of the characters are well-developed and have unique personalities. Jake has a hard time standing up for himself and has a lot of self-doubt. He knows that Nick isn’t the best role model, but Nick is the closest thing Jake has to a father figure. He enjoys learning about psychology and relates everything back to his every day life. Nick, on the other hand, has a dark philosophy that he lives by and teaches Jake. Nick doesn’t believe in right and wrong. He only believes in events that have no meaning. Burglary doesn’t bother him, and once the twist is introduced, the reader finds out that robbing people isn’t the only thing Nick is okay with doing. Another important character is Beth. She has her own problems that she has to deal with in the story. She’s a smart girl with a lot of helpful advice for Jake about being able to change yourself for the better.

While there are some slow points, the novel is pretty fast-paced and full of twists. The twists in this story are some of my favorites of the year. They’re not predictable and are a nice addition to the plot. They fit in with the overall story and make sense for where the novel was headed. I’m sure all of the twists will shock a lot of readers. I know I was pretty shocked while reading. The ending is a nice wrap up and fits the tone of the story.

Casting Shadows Everywhere is not an every day young adult novel. While there are some crude moments and strong language, there are some meaningful themes throughout that make the reader think. The characters are unique additions to the story, and the twists keep the reader guessing at every turn. I would recommend this to anyone that enjoys surprises and interesting characters within their stories.

My Rating:  ★★★★

My Obsession

I’ve watched quite a few movies and even read a few books that have a main character with psychological problems, and they are some of my favorites. That sounds kind of morbid, but I will explain. I absolutely love psychological thrillers, especially ones where the main character is searching for the killer or trying to solve a mystery and finds out that the culprit is himself/herself. An example of this would be that the protagonist has dissociative identity disorder (multiple personalities) but doesn’t realize it until the very end. I love when there is a high re-watch value for a movie or I can reread a book and find all of the clues I missed the first time.

I’d rather not mention any of the books or movies with this twist because I don’t want to spoil any of them for anyone. It would ruin the fun of finding out.

Which brings us to my dilemma. While reading or watching a new thriller, I seem to be obsessed with the idea of the main character being the perpetrator. I will be reading or watching a thriller or some type of mystery, and my first thought will be that the main protagonist is the killer or the person everyone is looking for. I will then pick out clues as I go along and create this elaborate ending that goes with my guess. Of course, when it turns out to be someone else, I’m a bit disappointed. I guess in my mind, the protagonist should always be the murderer or offender.

I just wanted to share this to find out if I’m the only one with this strange obsession. What are some unusual movie/book obsessions that you have?

The Broken Review

Genre: Romance/Thriller

*I received this book from Netgalley for an honest review.

The Broken by Shelley Coriell is about a woman named Kate Johnson and a man named Agent Hayden Reed. The story follows these two as their lives become intertwined by a similar foe, a serial killer named the Broadcast Butcher. Kate has spent three years trying to get away from this killer, and Hayden has done months of research, trying to stop the killer before he/she strikes again.

Kate was the first victim of the Broadcast Butcher and she managed to survive but not without being scarred physically and mentally. After the attack, she lives her life on the run to ensure her safety. Hayden, on the other hand, wants to find the Butcher, and in order to get closer to the killer, he must find Kate. Kate is the only survivor, and she has leads that will help with the investigation. Hayden has to earn Kate’s trust and must learn her dark secrets to finally stop the killings.

This novel was interesting, and I did like it for the most part, but there were some problems. There were a lot of red herrings, and once the reader found out who the killer is, it seemed kind of random. When the killer revealed himself/herself, it was a bit of an info dump. The killer wasn’t exciting, and I was kind of disappointed with who it ended up being. I actually forgot about this particular character until the end. There were also moments in the book that I felt weren’t plausible and really didn’t make much sense. Some examples: Sergeant Lottie King is an older heavy-set woman who wears three inch heels while working in the field, Kate being with Hayden while he investigates the case, and Smokey Joe being with Kate while she is in danger of being killed by the Butcher. It doesn’t seem like Lottie would be able to get much work done, and it seemed kind of silly. It didn’t seem safe to have Kate or Smokey around Hayden while he was investigating the case. The butcher wanted Kate, and it seemed to put her and others in unnecessary danger. I know Hayden doesn’t play by the rules but having them around didn’t seem like the best idea.

However, I did enjoy the characters. I loved their different personalities, and it was nice to see memorable secondary characters. Smokey Joe was one of my favorites. He was spirited and at times, very useful. Smokey held his own, and his fighting spirit was something to be admired. Kate’s fighting spirit was great as well. Even though she was on the run and feared the killer would try to find her, she still managed to go on with her life. She didn’t want the past to represent her, and she was pretty independent. Hayden desperately seeks justice and order. It was interesting to see Kate break his shell and make him rethink his obsession with control. The romance between Kate and Hayden was alright. I did like how their relationship started, but the confession was kind of odd to me and seemed out of place.

The Broken was an entertaining read. The characters were likable and provided some great moments in the novel. There were some problems I had with the plot, but I did end up liking the overall story. The killer was not the best or most memorable, but the plot was enjoyable. I would recommend this book. I will most likely be picking up the second book The Buried because it tells Hatch’s story. The synopsis sounds really interesting, and I’ll get it when it’s released later this year.

My Rating: ★★★

While I was reading The Broken and We Are The Goldens, I also managed to finish The Moth in the Mirror. So I was able to read two books and one novella this past week. I love feeling so accomplished at the end of each week. I think I’ll make reading more than one book at once my goal for the rest of the year. I’m not sure I will do it every week, but I will do my best. Of course, I might skip a day or two here and there to do other things or catch up, but I’m enjoying myself so far. Plus, my TBR pile isn’t looking as scary as it used to. Anyway, here are the next two books I will be reading:

Red Bang – Brandt Monroe
Genre – Fiction

Adam Murphy is a Hollywood screenwriter who has clearly lost his way. His wife, Jess, is a Los Angeles publicist who just lost her job. With the bills mounting and nowhere to turn in the City of Angels, Adam takes a chance on a complete life reboot – taking a job in Seattle at a billion-dollar, Fortune 500 technology behemoth and bringing his family along for the ride.

While working at The Company is a gloriously heady, benefit-laden playground for today’s smartest minds, Adam quickly realizes he has descended into a foreign land where the language, customs and politics will either make him stronger or cause a meltdown of epic proportions. Faced with a ‘win or fail’ attitude, Adam must find a way to deliver an innovative new product, defeat his political nemesis, align with a mysterious Company founder, and save his wife from a weather-induced depression all before The Company finds out he has no idea what he’s doing.

Inspired by the unbelievable things that go on behind closed doors of America’s largest companies, and bolstered by a warm-hearted, humorous look at one family’s fight against a Stepford-like culture, RED BANG will take you on a hilarious journey into the ridiculous hive mind of today’s tech giants.

Casting Shadows Everywhere – L. T. Vargus
Genre – Young Adult/Thriller

In his own words, 15 year old Jake is a “huge pussy.” He flinches. Always. He’s too timid to make a move on Beth, the buxom girl of his dreams, and too busy getting face-slammed into lockers by bullies to do much else. He seeks the guidance of the biggest badass he knows, his cousin Nick.

Nick is a professional burglar and makes Jake his apprentice. They stalk suburban neighborhoods night after night, ransacking houses for jewelry and sweet valuables. Nick teaches Jake the finer points of breaking and entering along with his dark philosophy – that there is no right or wrong in the world, just a series of events that happen without meaning.

At first, adopting Nick’s callous worldview helps Jake get over his fears and confront his tormentors, but he also unleashes an aggression in himself he never thought possible. And as he learns more about his cousin, he realizes that Nick’s crimes go way beyond burglary.

In the end, Jake must face not only the monster in his cousin but also the one in his own heart.

*Descriptions taken from Goodreads.

I was fortunate enough to receive these books for free. Red Bang is an ARC that is expected to be published on May 19th of this year, and Casting Shadows Everywhere was published on May 11th of last year. If anyone is interested, Goodreads is having a giveaway for Red Bang. Both of these stories sound really interesting, and I’m excited to start reading them.

I finished reading Daughter of Smoke & Bone and Red Dragon, and let me just say, they were pretty awesome. I’ll have my short review up for both in my monthly wrap-up. However, if anyone would like a full review on any of the books I read, just let me know. I would love requests if there are any.

The Broken – Shelley Coriell
Genre – Romance/Thriller
Pub. Date – April 29, 2014

He took her life, but left her alive.

Three years ago, reporter Kate Johnson was the first victim—and only survivor—of the Broadcast Butcher. Scarred both physically and psychologically by the brutal serial killer, Kate lives life on the run, knowing that one day, he will find her and finish what he started.

In the pursuit of justice, you sometimes have to step outside the law.

Agent Hayden Reed spends his life chasing monsters. The only way to stay sane is to detach, but the second the Broadcast Butcher case crosses his desk, Hayden knows this is the case that might just cost him his soul. To catch this vicious murderer before he strikes again, Hayden must find Kate and earn her trust. For it’s her darkest secrets that hold the key to stopping this madman once and for all. . .

We Are The Goldens – Dana Reinhardt
Genre – Young Adult/Contemporary
Pub. Date – May 27, 2014

Nell knows a secret about her perfect, beautiful sister Layla. If she tells, it could blow their world apart.

When Nell and Layla were little, Nell used to call them Nellaya. Because to Nell, there was no difference between where she started and her adored big sister ended. They’re a unit; divorce made them rely on each other early on, so when one pulls away, what is the other to do? But now, Nell’s a freshman in high school and Layla is changing, secretive. And then Nell discovers why. Layla is involved with one of their teachers. And even though Nell tries to support Layla, to understand that she’s happy and in love, Nell struggles with her true feelings: it’s wrong, and she must do something about it.

*Description taken from Goodreads.

I received both of these books from Netgalley. It’s really exciting to be able to read a book before it’s published and share my opinion on it. I requested The Broken, and I was pre-approved for We Are The Goldens, which is really amazing to me. I’m sure most users get way more pre-approved books, but since this is my first one, it’s very exciting. Both of them sound really interesting, and I’m looking forward to reading them.

Rampage Review

Rating: R

Rampage was released in 2009. It’s a mass murder thriller and lives up to the name. I wasn’t sure what I was getting myself into when I first began watching the film, but I’m glad I stayed to finish it. Rampage stars Brendan Fletcher, Michael Paré, Shaun Sipos, Lynda Boyd, and Robert Clarke. The plot is pretty easy to follow and understand.

It takes place in a fictional town in Oregon called Tenderville and follows Bill Williamson (Brendan Fletcher) who is a 23 year old man that still lives with his parents (Lynda Boyd and Robert Clarke). He works as a mechanic where he is victimized by his boss. His parents want him to move out of their house and start his own life while he has other ideas in mind. Added onto the issues with his job and his parents, Bill is constantly being exposed to the problems of the world through television, radio, and his friend Evan Drince (Shaun Sipos) who is highly critical of the human species. After talking with Evan, Bill goes home to assemble a suit of body armor and arms himself with two submachine guns. He drives to the center of town and all hell breaks loose.

The characters in Rampage are slightly underdeveloped and most are just there to move the plot along. Bill’s character seems to be the only character that has more development than the others. When he goes “crazy,” he does have a reason for doing so. The movie points out that the news reports are a main reason he goes on a rampage killing innocent people. Of course, he could have had a better reason but this is what makes the movie so interesting. It’s ambiguous in the sense that it makes the viewer decide why Bill decided to kill people in his town. Was it truly because he was disgusted at what the people in the world are capable of or was it due to the fact that he finally snapped? The interpretation is left up to the viewer to figure out for himself/herself.

At times, the fast paced movements of the camera makes it difficult to fully see what’s going on, but it adds to the hostility and panic that the film is trying to show the audience. In a situation as this film demonstrates, the environment wouldn’t be calm and steady but full of terror and chaos.

I was surprised by the ending of the film. While watching, I was coming up with ways that it could end, but I never came up with what actually happened. It was clever, and I wasn’t expecting it at all. It even added more depth to Bill’s character.

This movie does live up to its genre by showing a devastating mass murder of innocent lives. As a disclaimer, this movie is not for the faint of heart and could really upset some people. It’s a disturbing film, and the ending will not satisfy some viewers. Even though it’s quite a dark movie, I think that it’s worth watching.

My Rating: ★★★★

In Time Review

Rating: PG-13

In Time arrived in theaters on October 28, 2011. Once I saw previews for this movie, I knew that I had to see it. It’s a science fiction, thriller film, and even though it may not be the best in its genre, it still gives the viewers an enjoyable ride. A few of the stars in this film are Justin Timberlake, Olivia Wilde, Matt Bomer, Alex Pettyfer, Cillian Murphy, Amanda Seyfried, and Vincent Kartheiser. In Time is set in the future where time is life; each person has a clock on their left arms that reveals the amount of time they have left to live. After 25 years of life, a person’s clock starts, and he/she gets one year to either gain more time or “time out.” Time can be obtained by working, stealing, or being given it. Since time is currency, there is a huge gap between classes; those who have more time on their clocks are richer and live “better” lives, and those who do not have much time struggle to get through each day.

The viewer is introduced to the main character Will Salas (Justin Timberlake) who lives with his 50 year old mother, Rachel Salas (Olivia Wilde), in the ghettos. The most time he has ever had on his clock is about a day, so he lives his life day by day. He meets Henry Hamilton (Matt Bomer) who is being harassed by Fortis (Alex Pettyfer) in a bar. Fortis is the boss of a gang named the Minutemen, who are known for taking time from people by force; Will and Henry escape with their time. After a bit of talking, Henry explains the way the system works for the rich and poor, and eventually, Will is able to gain extra time from Henry. Once an unfortunate event occurs in Will’s life, he seeks revenge on the system that keeps the classes separated. Timekeeper Raymond Leon (Cillian Murphy) begins to track Will after believing he committed a murder in order to get the additional time. Will travels to a better district in order to stop the unfair treatment of classes; Will encounters Sylvia Weis (Amanda Seyfried) who is the daughter of a very rich and powerful man named Phillipe Weis (Vincent Kartheiser). Shortly after Will and Vincent meet, the fight between the classes officially begins.

The characters in this film seem to be well developed, and each actor brings their character to life. In a way, Will and Sylvia are relatable because who hasn’t wanted to change the way the system works or been a bit rebellious. Fortis is the man most people love to hate; he is a perfect bad guy. Raymond is the typical cop trying to make sure everyone obeys the laws and the way of life; he sticks to the rules no matter what and expects the same from the citizens, as well. Phillipe is the man opposing the protagonist, so the viewer, of course, wants to see him defeated. The characters’ motives are able to maintain the attention of the viewer and keep a person from looking at their own watch during the movie.

Even though, In Time might not be the very best in its genre, it sure does an excellent job keeping the audience entertained. Not only is there action, but a deep plot that makes a person think of their own life. This movie is definitely worth watching.

My Rating: ★★★★