Tag Archive: July


July 2014 Wrap-Up

The wrap-ups are coming slowly but surely. I’m hoping to get August and September up sometime this month too, but we will see if that happens.

*All descriptions for books taken from Goodreads and all descriptions for movies taken from IMDb.

How Not to Write a Novel – Howard Mittelmark and Sandra Newman
Genre – Non-Fiction
My Rating – ★★★★

Many writing books offer sound advice on how to write well. This is not one of those books. On the contrary, this is a collection of terrible, awkward, and laughably unreadable excerpts that will teach you what to avoid—at all costs—if you ever want your novel published.

In How Not to Write a Novel, authors Howard Mittelmark and Sandra Newman distill their 30 years combined experience in teaching, editing, writing, and reviewing fiction to bring you real advice from the other side of the query letter. Rather than telling you how or what to write, they identify the 200 most common mistakes unconsciously made by writers and teach you to recognize, avoid, and amend them. With hilarious “mis-examples” to demonstrate each manuscript-mangling error, they’ll help you troubleshoot your beginnings and endings, bad guys, love interests, style, jokes, perspective, voice, and more. As funny as it is useful, this essential how-NOT-to guide will help you get your manuscript out of the slush pile and into the bookstore.

Review: How Not to Write a Novel is an interesting take on writing-advice books. I’ve always read books for what you are supposed to do, so it was nice to see what not to do when writing a novel. The advice in this book is helpful while being witty and funny. The authors give great examples of everything they discuss, and they do it in a humorous way to make it stand out. There might be some obvious examples of what not to do, but everything is useful, and it’s always nice to refresh yourself on what to avoid while writing. The book doesn’t tell you to write a specific way, it explains that certain areas in your book would improve if you didn’t add anything unnecessary. I feel like every potential author should read this book. Mainly to keep from making simple mistakes and to help engage future readers.

 

Saga, Volume 1 (Saga #1-6) – Brian K. Vaughan (Writer) and Fiona Staples (Illustrator)
Genre – Graphic Novel/Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★★

When two soldiers from opposite sides of a never-ending galactic war fall in love, they risk everything to bring a fragile new life into a dangerous old universe.

From New York Times bestselling writer Brian K. Vaughan (Y: The Last Man, Ex Machina) and critically acclaimed artist Fiona Staples (Mystery Society, North 40), Saga is the sweeping tale of one young family fighting to find their place in the worlds. Fantasy and science fiction are wed like never before in this sexy, subversive drama for adults.

This specially priced volume collects the first six issues of the smash-hit series The Onion A.V. Club calls “the emotional epic Hollywood wishes it could make.”

Review: Saga is such a great graphic novel. I knew I would like it, but I wasn’t prepared to love it as much as I did. It has an amazing story and characters. The characters are what make the story so intriguing. They are unique, and I found myself wanting to know more about all of them. I love that we were able to see different points of view throughout the story. The plot and characters in the story are unpredictable. I had no idea where the story was going to go next or what the characters were going to do, and I really enjoy that aspect in books and graphic novels. The illustrations are beautiful and make the story seem real. However, Saga is definitely for adults because of all the nudity and graphic violence. It’s an exciting and fun graphic novel, and I need to get my hands on the second volume soon.

 

The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
Genre – Classic/Historical Fiction
My Rating – ★★★

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new–something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

Review: The Great Gatsby is a story where the characters could possibly make it or break it with some readers. The characters are quite realistic but most of them are unlikeable. They each have their own flaws that make them believable and interesting. It did surprise me that there were some boring moments in this book even though the story is short. These moments include unnecessary names and information. At one point there is close to a page and a half of names of people attending Gatsby’s party. I know what Fitzgerald was trying to do with it, but it just seems unneeded to progress the story. However, I really enjoyed the ending. I thought it wrapped up the story well, and it was interesting to see how each character reacted to what happened. I would recommend this classic, but you might need to get used to the writing style.

 

Perfect Shadow – Brent Weeks
Genre – Novella/Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★

Discover the origins of Durzo Blint in this original novella set in the world of Brent Weeks’ New York Times bestselling Night Angel trilogy.

“I got a bit of prophecy,” the old assassin said. “Not enough to be useful, you know. Just glimpses. My wife dead, things like that to keep me up late at night. I had this vision that I was going to be killed by forty men, all at once. But now that you’re here, I see they’re all you. Durzo Blint.”

Durzo Blint? Gaelan had never even heard the name.

***
Gaelan Starfire is a farmer, happy to be a husband and a father; a careful, quiet, simple man. He’s also an immortal, peerless in the arts of war. Over the centuries, he’s worn many faces to hide his gift, but he is a man ill-fit for obscurity, and all too often he’s become a hero, his very names passing into legend: Acaelus Thorne, Yric the Black, Hrothan Steelbender, Tal Drakkan, Rebus Nimble.

But when Gaelan must take a job hunting down the world’s finest assassins for the beautiful courtesan-and-crimelord Gwinvere Kirena, what he finds may destroy everything he’s ever believed in.

Review: Perfect Shadow is a nice addition to The Night Angel Trilogy. It gives great backstory for Durzo and Mama K. You get to feel a better connection to why they act a certain way. There’s more of a connection with Durzo when you read this novella before The Way of Shadows because you know more about him once you start the trilogy. The story can be a bit confusing at first because it’s not entirely clear what is going on, but after a section or two, it’s easy to figure out what’s happening. I will warn anyone that reads this before the trilogy that he/she might get some of the twists ruined for him/her. This novella gives away some details that are supposed to be a surprise in the first book, so you’ll have to decide if you want to be spoiled or read this book after finishing The Way of Shadows.

 

The Way of Shadows – Brent Weeks
Genre – Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★★

From New York Times Bestselling author Brent Weeks…
For Durzo Blint, assassination is an art-and he is the city’s most accomplished artist.

For Azoth, survival is precarious. Something you never take for granted. As a guild rat, he’s grown up in the slums, and learned to judge people quickly – and to take risks. Risks like apprenticing himself to Durzo Blint.

But to be accepted, Azoth must turn his back on his old life and embrace a new identity and name. As Kylar Stern, he must learn to navigate the assassins’ world of dangerous politics and strange magics – and cultivate a flair for death.

Review: The Way of Shadows is a great fantasy. There are a lot of characters in this story, but each of them are memorable and stand out. I found myself really enjoying every different perspective and that’s good since there were quite a few of them. Even though there are lots of characters and points of view, there are no dull moments in the story. Everyone is important to the plot, and it’s interesting to see what each character is doing. One aspect I like about the characters is that no one is 100% good or evil. They’re a mix and a lot of the time their morals are questionable. It’s interesting to see how everyone reacts to one another. Durzo is, of course, my favorite character. I did enjoy the writing style and all of the action-filled plot. Something interesting is always going on to make you want to keep reading. The novel has a ton of twists and turns that make it even more awesome. I would highly recommend this book to anyone wanting an entertaining plot and characters.

 

Vicious – V.E. Schwab
Genre – Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★★

A masterful, twisted tale of ambition, jealousy, betrayal, and superpowers, set in a near-future world.

Victor and Eli started out as college roommates—brilliant, arrogant, lonely boys who recognized the same sharpness and ambition in each other. In their senior year, a shared research interest in adrenaline, near-death experiences, and seemingly supernatural events reveals an intriguing possibility: that under the right conditions, someone could develop extraordinary abilities. But when their thesis moves from the academic to the experimental, things go horribly wrong. Ten years later, Victor breaks out of prison, determined to catch up to his old friend (now foe), aided by a young girl whose reserved nature obscures a stunning ability. Meanwhile, Eli is on a mission to eradicate every other super-powered person that he can find—aside from his sidekick, an enigmatic woman with an unbreakable will. Armed with terrible power on both sides, driven by the memory of betrayal and loss, the archnemeses have set a course for revenge—but who will be left alive at the end?

In Vicious, V. E. Schwab brings to life a gritty comic-book-style world in vivid prose: a world where gaining superpowers doesn’t automatically lead to heroism, and a time when allegiances are called into question.

Review: Vicious is another novel where the characters are not 100% good or evil. I love the idea that if someone were to get superpowers, it doesn’t mean that they will use it for good and that’s what makes this story so entertaining. They’re anti-heroes, and it’s not always clear who you should be rooting for. Each of them have their own selfish agenda they want to fulfill for one reason or another. I also love when there are no throwaway characters. If you were to take out any of the characters, the story wouldn’t be the same. Every character in this story is needed, and the characterization is really well-done. This story has a fantastic beginning and ending. The intro is memorable and really sucks you into the story from the start. The ending is the perfect ending for this type of novel because it sums everything up and makes sense for what was going on in the novel. Vicious is very character-oriented with an engaging story and world. I highly recommend this book! I want more from this world, and I hope there’s a sequel in the future for this story.

 


 

Waterworld
Rating – PG-13
My Rating – ★★★

In a future where the polar ice-caps have melted and Earth is almost entirely submerged, a mutated mariner fights starvation and outlaw “smokers,” and reluctantly helps a woman and a young girl try to find dry land.

Review: While Waterworld is far from being the best, it’s still an entertaining movie. The world is unique, and it’s easy to tell a lot of work went into the props and sets. That aspect is my favorite part of the movie. Just seeing the new inventions they created was pretty awesome. On the other hand, the characters and the plot could have been better. The characters are amusing and somewhat believable, but you don’t really get attached to them. It’s a fun story about an alternate future, but don’t expect it to be in your top five.

 

Wild America
Rating – PG
My Rating – ★★★

Three brothers – Marshall, Marty and Mark dream of becoming naturalists and portraying animal life of America. One summer their dream comes true, they travel through America, filming alligators, bears and moose.

Review: Wild America is a fun adventure story that’s full of surprises. The only reason this doesn’t get a higher star rating is because the ending is a little strange. Once the boys get to the scene with the bears everything starts to fall apart. The bears look extremely fake, and the way the situation is resolved seemed ridiculous. Chad and I ended up laughing during most of the ending. However, everything is believable up until that point, and it’s really enjoyable to watch.

 

The Great Gatsby (1974)
Rating – PG
My Rating – ★★★½

A Midwesterner becomes fascinated with his nouveau riche neighbor, who obsesses over his lost love.

Review: After reading the book, I wanted to watch one of the many film adaptations. We chose this one because it was the only one on Netflix at the time. It was nice to see the book come to life, and in some ways, the movie was better than the book. Some of the scenes were altered and seemed to make more sense. The acting was better than we expected, but there were some times it was a little off. Myrtle, for instance, seemed a bit more dramatic with everything than she did in the book. If you enjoyed the book, I  believe you will enjoy this movie as well because it tries to stay true to the source material.

The Under-Hyped Readathon has ended, and I’m torn between being happy and disappointed. On the one hand, I read a fantastic book, and on the other hand, I only read one book. I finished Vicious by V. E. Schwab (Victoria Schwab), and I started The Fever by Megan Abbott. I wasn’t able to read as much as I wanted to, but I had a lot of fun participating.

I’m really glad I read Vicious because it was amazing. It’s now one of my favorite books. I feel like this Gif is the best way to show how I felt after I finished it.

Vicious kind of put me in a tiny reading slump because I seem to only want to read stories involving this world and the characters. I really hope there’s a sequel to this book. I need more! If you read the description for this book and think it sounds at all interesting, you should definitely give it a shot!

I’m really enjoying these readathons because they are giving me extra incentive to read books I might not otherwise read. Let me know if you’re participating in any readathons or read-alongs or what you read this week.

July 2014 Book Haul

Finally, I’m slowly getting back on track with my posts. I’m still working on the monthly wrap-ups, but I should have them all up next month if I’m lucky and don’t procrastinate. I’ll have some reviews up too. Probably after the Under-Hyped Readathon when I don’t have to focus on reading as much. Plus, I have a book giveaway that I’m planning to do. So much to do, so little time. I’ll keep you updated as I go. So while we all wait for me to get my stuff in order, here is a book haul to ease me back into the motions of blogging.

*All descriptions taken from Goodreads.

Looking for JJ – Anne Cassidy
Genre – Young Adult/Mystery

Three children walked away from the cottages on the edge of town toward Berwick Waters. Later that day, only two of them came back. . . .  Alice Tully knows exactly what happened that spring day six years ago, though it’s still hard for her to believe it. She’ll never be able to forget, even though she’s trying to lead a normal life–she has a job, friends, and a boyfriend whom she adores. But Alice’s past is dangerous, and violent, and sad . . . and it’s about to rip her new life apart. A gripping and emotionally searing novel by accomplished British author Anne Cassidy, Looking for JJ infuses a terrifying subject with humanity and hope.

 

Black City – Elizabeth Richards
Genre – Young Adult/Science Fiction

A dark and tender post-apocalyptic love story set in the aftermath of a bloody war.

In a city where humans and Darklings are now separated by a high wall and tensions between the two races still simmer after a terrible war, sixteen-year-old Ash Fisher, a half-blood Darkling, and Natalie Buchanan, a human and the daughter of the Emissary, meet and do the unthinkable—they fall in love. Bonded by a mysterious connection that causes Ash’s long-dormant heart to beat, Ash and Natalie first deny and then struggle to fight their forbidden feelings for each other, knowing if they’re caught, they’ll be executed—but their feelings are too strong.

When Ash and Natalie then find themselves at the center of a deadly conspiracy that threatens to pull the humans and Darklings back into war, they must make hard choices that could result in both their deaths.

 

Charm & Strange – Stephanie Kuehn
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

When you’ve been kept caged in the dark, it’s impossible to see the forest for the trees. It’s impossible to see anything, really. Not without bars . . .

Andrew Winston Winters is at war with himself.

He’s part Win, the lonely teenager exiled to a remote Vermont boarding school in the wake of a family tragedy. The guy who shuts all his classmates out, no matter the cost.

He’s part Drew, the angry young boy with violent impulses that control him. The boy who spent a fateful, long-ago summer with his brother and teenage cousins, only to endure a secret so monstrous it led three children to do the unthinkable.

Over the course of one night, while stuck at a party deep in the New England woods, Andrew battles both the pain of his past and the isolation of his present.

Before the sun rises, he’ll either surrender his sanity to the wild darkness inside his mind or make peace with the most elemental of truths—that choosing to live can mean so much more than not dying.

 

Into the Darkest Corner – Elizabeth Haynes
Genre – Thriller

When young, pretty Catherine Bailey meets Lee Brightman, she can’t believe her luck. Gorgeous, charismatic, and a bit mysterious, Lee seems almost too perfect to be true.

But what begins as flattering attention and spontaneous, passionate sex transforms into raging jealousy, and Catherine soon discovers that Lee’s dazzling blue eyes and blond good looks hide a dark, violent nature. Disturbed by his increasingly erratic, controlling behavior, she tries to break it off; turning to her friends for support, she’s stunned to find they don’t believe her. Increasingly isolated and driven into the darkest corner of her world, a desperate Catherine plans a meticulous escape.

Four years later, Lee is behind bars and Catherine—now Cathy—is trying to build a new life in a new city. Though her body has healed, the trauma of the past still haunts her. Then Stuart Richardson, her attractive new neighbor, moves in. Encouraging her to confront her fears, he sparks unexpected hope and the possibility of love and a normal life.

Until the day the phone rings . . .

 

Wereling – Steve Feasey
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Fourteen-year-old Trey Laporte is not a kid anymore. Not after the day he wakes up in agony—retina-splitting, vomit-inducing agony. His clothes are torn. His room is trashed.

Enter Lucien Charron, the mysterious, long-lost “uncle” with freakish fire-flecked eyes and skin that blisters in the sun. Suddenly, Trey finds himself living in a luxury penthouse at the heart of a strange and sinister empire built on the powers of the Netherworld—vampires, demons, sorcerers, and djinn.

And there is a girl—Alexa Charron—who is half vampire, half human, and insanely pretty, with powers all of her own. Trey is falling for her.

Trey is training night and day to control the newly discovered power lurking inside him. Now, demons are closing in on every side, and the most psychopathic bloodsucker to rock the Netherworld wants to destroy him. Above all, he must face one terrifying question:

Is he a boy . . . or is he a beast?

What’s Left of Me – Kat Zhang
Genre – Young Adult/Science Fiction

I should not exist. But I do.

Eva and Addie started out the same way as everyone else—two souls woven together in one body, taking turns controlling their movements as they learned how to walk, how to sing, how to dance. But as they grew, so did the worried whispers. Why aren’t they settling? Why isn’t one of them fading? The doctors ran tests, the neighbors shied away, and their parents begged for more time. Finally Addie was pronounced healthy and Eva was declared gone. Except, she wasn’t . . .

For the past three years, Eva has clung to the remnants of her life. Only Addie knows she’s still there, trapped inside their body. Then one day, they discover there may be a way for Eva to move again. The risks are unimaginable-hybrids are considered a threat to society, so if they are caught, Addie and Eva will be locked away with the others. And yet . . . for a chance to smile, to twirl, to speak, Eva will do anything.

 

Dangerous Girls – Abigail Haas
Genre – Young Adult/Mystery

It’s Spring Break of senior year. Anna, her boyfriend Tate, her best friend Elise, and a few other close friends are off to a debaucherous trip to Aruba that promises to be the time of their lives. But when Elise is found brutally murdered, Anna finds herself trapped in a country not her own, fighting against vile and contemptuous accusations.

As Anna sets out to find her friend’s killer; she discovers hard truths about her friendships, the slippery nature of truth, and the ache of young love.

As she awaits the judge’s decree, it becomes clear that everyone around her thinks she is not just guilty, but dangerous. When the truth comes out, it is more shocking than one could ever imagine…

 

The End Games – T. Michael Martin
Genre – Young Adult/Horror

It happened on Halloween.

The world ended.

And a dangerous Game brought it back to life.

Seventeen-year-old Michael and his five-year-old brother, Patrick, have been battling monsters in The Game for weeks.

In the rural mountains of West Virginia, armed with only their rifle and their love for each other, the brothers follow Instructions from the mysterious Game Master. They spend their days searching for survivors, their nights fighting endless hordes of “Bellows”—creatures that roam the dark, roaring for flesh. And at this Game, Michael and Patrick are very good.

But The Game is changing.

The Bellows are evolving.

The Game Master is leading Michael and Patrick to other survivors—survivors who don’t play by the rules.

And the brothers will never be the same.

 

Wolves – Shaun Ellis
Genre – Non-Fiction/Animals

This book offers a tantalizing glimpse into the private life of the wolf, a symbol of the spirit of wildness that is now in such short supply in our modern world.

More than 200 stunning and inspirational photographs of wolves, coupled with detailed observations of their behavior, dispel many of the myths that surround these powerful animals and form an impression of the true nature of the wolf.

Written and illustrated by two wolf experts who have spent hours tracking and watching wolves, Wolves portrays the complexities and wonders of wolf society and inspires a deep respect for an animal that has long held a fascination for humans.

All the Truth That’s in Me – Julie Berry
Genre – Young Adult/Historical Fiction

Four years ago, Judith and her best friend disappeared from their small town of Roswell Station. Two years ago, only Judith returned, permanently mutilated, reviled and ignored by those who were once her friends and family. Unable to speak, Judith lives like a ghost in her own home, silently pouring out her thoughts to the boy who’s owned her heart as long as she can remember—even if he doesn’t know it—her childhood friend, Lucas. But when Roswell Station is attacked, long-buried secrets come to light, and Judith is forced to choose: continue to live in silence, or recover her voice, even if it means changing her world, and the lives around her, forever. This startlingly original novel will shock and disturb you; it will fill you with Judith’s passion and longing; and its mysteries will keep you feverishly turning the pages until the very last.

 

Room – Emma Donoghue
Genre – Contemporary

To five-year-old Jack, Room is the entire world. It is where he was born and grew up; it’s where he lives with his Ma as they learn and read and eat and sleep and play. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits.

Room is home to Jack, but to Ma, it is the prison where Old Nick has held her captive for seven years. Through determination, ingenuity, and fierce motherly love, Ma has created a life for Jack. But she knows it’s not enough…not for her or for him. She devises a bold escape plan, one that relies on her young son’s bravery and a lot of luck. What she does not realize is just how unprepared she is for the plan to actually work.

Told entirely in the language of the energetic, pragmatic five-year-old Jack, ROOM is a celebration of resilience and the limitless bond between parent and child, a brilliantly executed novel about what it means to journey from one world to another.

BookTubeAThon Conclusion

BookTubeAThon has come to a close. This was a lot of fun, and I’m glad I participated. Chad also decided to participate in this readathon, so I’ll include his results at the end. We actually ended up completing the same amount of challenges, even though I ended up reading 645 more pages than he did (Shh, don’t tell him). We both started a series but neither of us finished them. Chad is going to carry his book over into the Under-Hyped Readathon because it has less than 1,000 ratings. I’ll be switching to Vicious by V. E. Schwab. Anyway, here are the results for the BookTubeAThon challenges:

My Results:

Monday:

  • Finished Saga, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughan (160 pages)
  • Completed Challenge 1 (book with pictures)

Tuesday:

  • Finished The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (180 pages)
  • Completed Challenge 5 (book from genre I’ve read the least)
  • Completed Challenge 6 (book to movie adaptation)

Wednesday:

  • Finished Perfect Shadow by Brent Weeks (99 pages)
  • Completed Challenge 4 (book someone picks out for you)

Sunday:

I managed to read four books (1,084 pages), and I completed four challenges. This was a successful readathon, and it helped me get back into reading after my break. I was able to read some books that I have been meaning to read for a while.

Chad’s Results:

  • Finished Perfect Shadow by Brent Weeks (99 pages)
    • Completed Challenge 1 (book with pictures)
  • Finished The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (180 pages)
    • Completed Challenge 5 (book from genre I’ve read the least)
    • Completed Challenge 6 (book to movie adaptation)
  • Finished Saga, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughan (160 pages)
    • Completed Challenge 4 (book someone picks out for you)

I decided to participate in the challenges mostly just to help motivate Heather, but I really enjoyed it once we got going.  I hadn’t read an entire book in more than a year and it felt good to get back into reading.  The Great Gatsby really slowed me down though, and I had to take a  few days off before reading Saga.  – Chad

After participating in the BookTubeAThon, I want to keep my momentum up and do another readathon. (I’ll be posting my BookTubeAThon conclusion tomorrow.) I think the under-hyped readathon is a great idea because we get to share and read books that are not well-known.

The readathon starts on July 21st and ends on July 27th. The only rules are that the books have to be considered under-hyped. An example being that you only read books under 5,000 ratings on Goodreads, but it’s up to the reader what they consider under-hyped. The Under-Hyped Readathon’s Goodreads page has more information and discussions to participate in as you read.

Below is the list of some books that I plan on trying to read during this week. Of course, I won’t be able to read them all, but I’ll be able to pick from a variety of books.

  1. Vicious by V. E. Schwab (Victoria Schwab)
  2. The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke
  3. A Feast of Snakes by Harry Crews
  4. Dangerous Girls by Abigail Haas (Abby McDonald)
  5. Following Polly by Karen Bergreen
  6. Six Months Later by Natalie Richards
  7. The Fever by Megan Abbott

All of these books are under 5,000 ratings on Goodreads except for The Assassin’s Curse, which has almost 7,000 ratings. I might end up taking it off the list later, but I’ll leave it for now because I’ve been really wanting to read it. I’ve also been wanting to read Vicious, so I think that will be the first book I pick up during this week. I’ll have a post in the middle of the week to show where I am with my reading. Let me know if you’re participating in this readathon or what you’re planning on reading during this week. Happy reading!

UPDATE (7/21/14):

Chad has decided he wants to participate in this readathon too, so I’m going to add in his choices below:

  1. The Edge of the World by Kevin J. Anderson
  2. The Map of All Things by Kevin J. Anderson
  3. The Key to Creation by Kevin J. Anderson
  4. Russian Amerika by Stoney Compton
  5. Weapons of Choice by John Birmingham

BookTubeAThon Update

The third day of BookTubeAThon has concluded, so I thought I would post an update of my progress so far. I’m doing pretty well with completing challenges and keeping up with my reading.

Monday:

  • Finished Saga, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughan (160 pages)
  • Completed Challenge 1 (book with pictures)

Tuesday:

  • Finished The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (180 pages)
  • Completed Challenge 5 (book from genre I’ve read the least)
  • Completed Challenge 6 (book to movie adaptation)

Wednesday:

  • Finished Perfect Shadow by Brent Weeks (99 pages)
  • Completed Challenge 4 (book someone picks out for you)

I’ve read 439 pages and completed four of the challenges. I’m planning on reading The Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks next. I haven’t been keeping up with the 300 pages a day, of course, so I may pick another book out to have a total of seven books. It all depends on how I do with The Night Angel Trilogy. I’m having a lot of fun with the challenges, and it’s great to take some books off of my TBR pile. I hope everyone is having a great BookTubeAThon, and I will be sure to post another update soon.

I’m Back!

I’m happy to announce that I’m back to blogging. Of course, the break was longer than I anticipated, but it was great, and I really needed it. While I was away, Chad and I worked on our Wreck This Journal which has been a lot of fun. We are far from finished, but it’s coming along nicely. I’m not sure if I will post pictures or not. There’s always a chance though. Other than that, I did finish two books, Fangirl and How Not to Write a Novel. I’ll have both of those in my June Wrap-Up. The May Wrap-Up will also be coming soon once I get back on track.

In my Taking a Break post I said I was going to work out a schedule for my posting. However, I decided that I won’t have a specific schedule for when I post anything. I’d rather not have days where I’m forced to post something when I’m not in the mood. Even without a schedule, I’m going to do my best to post a few times a week.

As a coming back gift, I have a special giveaway that I’m planning to do. Be on the lookout for a post with more details about this in the next few days. Hint: It’s a book that was recently released and may or may not have been signed by the author.  ; )