Category: Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is new series that I want to start reading. This top ten will focus on recently published (around 1 to 2 years) series that I want to read. Of course there are tons of new series that I want to start, but I picked the ones I’m most excited to read. These are all published in 2013 or 2014, and they are in no particular order.

Written in Red by Anne Bishop (The Others) – I’ve heard some really great things about this series, and honestly, I’m not sure why I haven’t started it yet because I’ve been wanting to read it for a while.

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski (The Winner’s Trilogy) – I just bought this book, and I can’t wait to start reading it. I’ve heard good things about it, and it sounds like something I would enjoy.

A Thousand Pieces of You by Claudia Gray (Firebird) – The description sounds amazing, and the cover definitely caught my attention. It’s gorgeous, and I want to find out what happens with this story.

Not a Drop to Drink by Mindy McGinnis (Not a Drop to Drink) –  I really enjoy dystopian stories most of the time, and this one sounds pretty unique. I’m really interested to see where this books goes.

The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani (The School for Good and Evil) – I’m a big fan of anime, and for some reason this book reminds me of some of the shows I’ve watched, so I’m all for it. Obviously it won’t be like anime, but it sounds really intriguing.

The Program by Suzanne Young (The Program) – I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while now. I just need to either buy it or borrow it from the library. I’m sure I’ll end up buying it though.

Half a King by Joe Abercrombie (Shattered Sea) – This is another one that I have heard great things about. I want to be engrossed in another high fantasy story, and see how the main character is able to overcome his physical disabilities.

The Clockwork Scarab by Colleen Gleason (Stoker & Holmes) – Fictional relatives of a famous author and a detective come together to solve a mystery. This sounds amazing, and I want to know how the story plays out.

The Nightmare Affair by Mindee Arnett (The Arkwell Academy) – I’m interested to see where this goes. I’ve never read a book where the main character is a nightmare, so this should be fun.

Cursed by Lizzy Ford (Voodoo Nights) – I really love this cover. I know you shouldn’t judge a book that way, but it just looks so pretty, and the story sounds really good.

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Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is places books have made me want to visit. This can include places that are real or fictional. They’re listed in no particular order.

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (Battle School) – The biggest reason I would want to go to the Battle School is to experience the Battle Room. It’s laser tag without gravity. What could be cooler than that?

Harry Potter Series by J. K. Rowling (Hogwarts) – I want to see what the castle would be like. It seems like there is always something exciting going on and an adventure around every corner. However, I’ll be avoiding the Forbidden Forest. I can’t handle any giant spiders.

Vicious by V. E. Schwab (Merit) – I would mostly want to go to Merit because of the superpowers. There’s isn’t much memorable about the place, but it’s a world that has superpowers. I know I’m just visiting, but I’m taking my powers with me when I leave. Plus, I really need to meet Victor … for science, of course.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline (Oasis) – I need this in my life. Being the video game nerd that I am, I would love this virtual world. I’m sure I would never get anything done though, so maybe it’s a good thing it doesn’t exist.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Gatsby’s Mansion) – I want to go to a Gatsby party. I’m not normally an overly social person, but there ain’t no party like a Gatsby party.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Wonderland) – It’s seems like a crazy, fun place full of interesting characters. I want to meet the Cheshire Cat as well. If cats could talk, I feel like that is exactly how they would act.

The Archived by Victoria Schwab (The Archive) – The archive is described as “a place where the dead rest on shelves like books.” It would be interesting to see how everything is set up because it’s such a unique concept.

Dreams of the Dead by Thomas Randall (Japan) – While this is a horror story, I would still want to go to Japan based on how it’s described in this book. I’ve always wanted to go because I think Japanese culture is fascinating.

Pivot Point by Kasie West (Compound) – This is another place I want to go because of the powers they have. While I wont get any powers, it would be cool to see how everything operates. They probably won’t let me in though since I’m just a “Norm.” 😦

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins (Paris) – Another place I have always wanted to go. This book just made me want to go even more. It seems like a beautiful place.

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is books that are character driven. These are books that rely heavily on the characters to tell the story. Everyone’s interpretation of that may be different. These books are ones I felt best fit that description. They’re listed in no particular order. If you’ve done this Top Ten Tuesday, feel free to link your post in the comments, so I can check it out. 🙂

Vicious by V.E. Schwab – This book really stands out because of the characters. Each of them are essential, and I mean what’s not to love about anti-heroes and superpowers. Vicious is a new favorite of mine, and I’ve been trying to get everyone I know to read it.

The Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks – While the story is high fantasy, it’s driven by the characters. There are so many of them, but they each stand out. The characters and how they interact are some of the most memorable parts. The plot is great but watching the characters grow and develop is what really makes the story compelling.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – This is one book where the characters make it or break it for some readers. They’re realistic in the sense that they’re all flawed in their own way. The choices they make and how they handle themselves are the main focus of the novel.

The Murder Farm by Andrea Maria Schenkel – Told mostly through testimonies of the villagers, The Murder Farm relies entirely on it’s characters to tell the story. All the voices are unique and new characters are constantly introduced to propel the plot. Full Review

We Are the Goldens by Dana Reinhardt – The story is told through first-person, but Nell (the protagonist) speaks directly to the reader as if she is talking to her sister Layla. The relationship between the sisters is what drives the story and draws the reader in. Full Review

Overnight by Adele Griffin – A group of friends have a sleepover and one of them disappears. Everything that follows gets told through the alternating perspectives of several of the girls. Each of them are unique even if a bit cliche at times, but it’s how they each deal with the situation and how they react that tells the story.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness – The main character in this story deals with very serious issues, and it does get emotional. The focus of the story is on Conor and how he deals with everything happening in his life. He’s relatable in the sense that you can understand what he is going through and the emotions he’s feeling. Full Review

Black Box by Julie Schumacher – This story deals with a family struggling to help a member who is suffering from severe depression. The family has to learn how to understand what Dora is thinking and feeling, and at times, they find it very difficult. What makes this story stand out is that instead of the main character being the one who is suffering, it’s her sister. This allows the reader to see a side of the situation that isn’t usually shown. Full Review

Easy by Tammara Webber – A cute story about a girl and boy who fall in love while in college. They each have their own past to deal with before they can officially move on. The characters are believable, and they deal with some major issues over the course of the novel.

Shayla’s Double Brown Baby Blues by Lori Aurelia Williams – While there are a lot of sub-plots, all of them are character driven and focus on a certain aspect of each of the characters’ lives. Some of them are relatable, though others are not. They are all well-developed and make the story more believable. Full Review

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. I’ve decided that I want to participate in the Top Ten weekly posts. While I might not post every week, I will as often as I can.

This week’s topic is books that you’ve had a difficult time reading for one reason or another. They’re in no particular order.

The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams – This was an incredibly hard book to read because of the subject matter. It’s very sad, and the whole time you want to somehow help this poor girl out of her horrible situation. I started this book at night and didn’t put it down until I was done at four in the morning. It’s a hard story to put down because you want to know what happens next and emotional because you’ll be sad, frustrated, angry, and happy all within a few chapters.

Shizuko’s Daughter by Kyoko Mori – This is another emotional read but for different reasons. Yuki is left all alone when her mother commits suicide. Her dad doesn’t seem to love her, and her stepmother treats her terribly. She is easy to become attached to and you want to be able to help her. It’s told through different perspectives, and during certain ones, you feel extremely sorry for Yuki and what she has to deal with. A great story about a girl dealing with the death of a parent and having to move on with her life.  Full Review

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson – This is a beautifully told story dealing with serious issues. You’re empathetic with Melinda and her situation because as she’s struggling with this difficult problem, everyone seems to be turning against her. There are plenty of times I wanted her to speak up for herself, but it’s understandable why she would stay silent for so long. Honestly, I think everyone should read this story. Especially high school students because I feel the story has a special way of teaching about empowerment and speaking up for yourself, while also showing how the victim feels.

A Fair Maiden by Joyce Carol Oates – Cringeworthy would be a great word to describe this book. It deals with the relationship between a 16 year old girl and an 80 year old man. There are plenty of disturbing moments that make your skin crawl. It’s as if you’re watching a horror movie and screaming at the characters to stop and run the other way. I have never felt so much pity for a character at the end of a novel like I did this one. It’s a really interesting story, but I know it won’t be for everyone. Full Review

My Life as a White Trash Zombie by Diana Rowland – While this was a very interesting concept, it wasn’t quite what I expected. There were some boring moments, and the main character repeated herself so much, it got kind of old. It was a bit hard to relate to her since she has an addiction to pills, but she’s a unique character, and I did like her personality. I liked the overall story, but it was difficult to get through at certain points.

The Fever by Megan Abbott – I thought this would be more of a mystery, but it’s mostly about teenagers and how they act. It had a few boring moments during the middle of the book. There were a lot of red herrings, and the ending was not as great as I was expecting. This book just wasn’t for me. Full Review

Trapped by Michael Northrop – Honestly, I didn’t really like anything about this book. This is one of those books that just didn’t work for me. There were no surprises, the characters were boring and flat, and the ending was unsatisfying. It was difficult for me to finish this novel.

Slated by Teri Terry –  I really wanted to like this book, but the characters weren’t great, and while the plot had potential, it didn’t quite work for me. Full Review

Zombie Blondes by Brian James – I accidentally read it twice because I had forgotten I had read it before. This was way before I discovered Goodreads where I could track all of my read books. I didn’t enjoy this story as much as I had hoped. The main character is judgmental, the father is incompetent when it comes to his daughter, and the plot is predictable. However, the ending had a new twist that I liked.

The Maze Runner by James Dashner – I was prepared to really enjoy this novel because of all the hype, but the hype sort of killed it for me. I did like it, but I had trouble getting through this book at certain parts. As I was reading, I kept picking up similarities to Lord of the Flies, so I did some research and found out that Lord of the Flies inspired The Maze Runner. I often like when books are inspired by my favorites, however, it did ruin a scene during the ending for me because it was almost exactly from Lord of the Flies.