Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is books that are character driven. These are books that rely heavily on the characters to tell the story. Everyone’s interpretation of that may be different. These books are ones I felt best fit that description. They’re listed in no particular order. If you’ve done this Top Ten Tuesday, feel free to link your post in the comments, so I can check it out. 🙂

Vicious by V.E. Schwab – This book really stands out because of the characters. Each of them are essential, and I mean what’s not to love about anti-heroes and superpowers. Vicious is a new favorite of mine, and I’ve been trying to get everyone I know to read it.

The Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks – While the story is high fantasy, it’s driven by the characters. There are so many of them, but they each stand out. The characters and how they interact are some of the most memorable parts. The plot is great but watching the characters grow and develop is what really makes the story compelling.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – This is one book where the characters make it or break it for some readers. They’re realistic in the sense that they’re all flawed in their own way. The choices they make and how they handle themselves are the main focus of the novel.

The Murder Farm by Andrea Maria Schenkel – Told mostly through testimonies of the villagers, The Murder Farm relies entirely on it’s characters to tell the story. All the voices are unique and new characters are constantly introduced to propel the plot. Full Review

We Are the Goldens by Dana Reinhardt – The story is told through first-person, but Nell (the protagonist) speaks directly to the reader as if she is talking to her sister Layla. The relationship between the sisters is what drives the story and draws the reader in. Full Review

Overnight by Adele Griffin – A group of friends have a sleepover and one of them disappears. Everything that follows gets told through the alternating perspectives of several of the girls. Each of them are unique even if a bit cliche at times, but it’s how they each deal with the situation and how they react that tells the story.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness – The main character in this story deals with very serious issues, and it does get emotional. The focus of the story is on Conor and how he deals with everything happening in his life. He’s relatable in the sense that you can understand what he is going through and the emotions he’s feeling. Full Review

Black Box by Julie Schumacher – This story deals with a family struggling to help a member who is suffering from severe depression. The family has to learn how to understand what Dora is thinking and feeling, and at times, they find it very difficult. What makes this story stand out is that instead of the main character being the one who is suffering, it’s her sister. This allows the reader to see a side of the situation that isn’t usually shown. Full Review

Easy by Tammara Webber – A cute story about a girl and boy who fall in love while in college. They each have their own past to deal with before they can officially move on. The characters are believable, and they deal with some major issues over the course of the novel.

Shayla’s Double Brown Baby Blues by Lori Aurelia Williams – While there are a lot of sub-plots, all of them are character driven and focus on a certain aspect of each of the characters’ lives. Some of them are relatable, though others are not. They are all well-developed and make the story more believable. Full Review

Advertisements