Archive for October, 2014


Where I’ve Been + NaNoWriMo

Some of you may have noticed over the past few days that my blog had been suspended. I’m finally back and everything is fixed. The problem came from my most recent post Ten Items I Would Want in a Zombie Apocalypse. One of the pictures I included contained a link that caused problems with WordPress. My blog was automatically suspended and it happened as soon as I posted. It took three days of working with the support team to get my blog back up. It was very frustrating to say the least, and I thought I was going to lose all of my posts and hard work. Turns out my link didn’t violate terms of service because I only linked to a larger version of the picture. So long story short, my blog is back and I didn’t lose anything.

On that note, make sure you’re careful with what pictures or gifs you link on your blog. Make sure to save copies of your work because if you do violate the terms of service, they can permanently suspend your blog and remove all of its content. You probably won’t get a warning either (I didn’t). I’m sure most of you know this already, but I wanted to spread the word just in case. The only good thing about all of this is that the support team was really friendly and helpful. Once they responded, it took less than a day to get everything up and working again.

A special thanks to Molly and Diana. They helped keep me motivated and optimistic about all of this. You should definitely check out their blogs because they are wonderful.

 


 

On to happier news! I’ve decided to participate in NaNoWriMo next month. It’s very short notice since it begins on Saturday but that’s mostly due to not being able to access my blog for the first half of this week. I did try NaNoWriMo last year, but it didn’t go as well as I had hoped. This year, however, I’m not going to push myself to write a certain amount every day. I’m just going to see how it goes and how much I can accomplish.

I might not be as active on my blog as I have been. I want to focus a lot on writing and try to get some of this story put together. I’ve been wanting to work on this novel for a long time and it’s about time I start. I’ll still try to post as often as time permits, but if you don’t see anything at least you know what I’m up to. In the meantime, you can still contact me through Goodreads, Twitter, or my contact page. I’ll still be checking all of those every day.

Feel free to add me as a buddy for NaNoWriMo: hncook4

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I was approached by the community manager at Man Crates to make a post about what I would want to have if I was stuck in a horror movie. It sounded like a really fun idea, so of course I agreed. Man Crates is a company that specializes in gifts for men. The concept is to ship your man a crate that he has to open with a crowbar. There are different types of crates to choose from, and there are even some for zombie survival. If this sounds interesting to you, definitely check out the website.

While I don’t watch a lot of horror movies, I do enjoy some with zombies. If I was stuck in a zombie apocalypse, these are the items I would want to have to help me survive.

 

1. Magnesium Fire Starter

Fire is very important for cooking and for keeping warm. I don’t know about you, but I don’t believe I would be able to start a fire with only sticks, especially when I’m fearing for my life. That’s why I would want one of these.

A lighter would be nice, but it would eventually run out of fuel and knowing my luck it would happen when I need it the most.

 

2. Gun With Lots of Ammo and a Silencer

Killing the zombies will be very important and for that, I will need a weapon. My first choice is to have a gun with lots of ammo. In an ideal zombie apocalypse, I will have plenty of ammo to spare and will never run out. I want to be able to kill them without having to get too close. The silencer will help keep it quiet and prevent more zombies from being drawn to the noise.

When I’m not killing zombies with the gun, I can hunt with it. Or you know, celebrate being alive as shown in this gif:

 

3. Axe

For those times when I have to get up close and personal with the undead, a gun might not be convenient. This is where an axe will be handy.

Plus, I can use it to break open doors to loot houses as needed. Yay vandalism!

4. Medical Kit

This will be essential for me because I can be a klutz and swinging an axe around to break into peoples’ houses will only make that worse. I’m going to need bandages, disinfectant, pain killers, and everything else I can squeeze in there.

If I’m going to die from the zombie apocalypse, I don’t want it to be because my boo boo got infected.

 

5. Flashlight and Plenty of Batteries

There will be plenty of dark nights, so having a flashlight will be very important. I won’t be one of these horror movie victims that can’t see in the dark because they don’t have any light. And there’s nothing worse than a flashlight without batteries, so I want to make sure I stockpile those as well.

I could get a mechanically powered flashlight, but they normally make noise and that’s not good when zombies are around, especially in the dark.

 

6. Athletic Shoes

There will be lots of running, so I want some decent running shoes that will last a while. The shoes I have now are not good for running, so if I was stuck with those, I would be doomed. I might want a couple pairs too. While we’re planning for the apocalypse, we might as well be extra prepared.

 

7. Canned Food and Can Opener

I have to eat and hunting won’t always be effective, so I need another source of food that will last me a while. Canned goods will stay fresh for a long period of time. To get into most cans, I will also need a can opener. I could use my axe but that might get messy.

 

8. Solar Charger

Life without electricity is going to suck. I want be able to use some of my electronics for a little while at least. I would want a solar charger, so I can read my e-books, listen to music, and watch movies when I’m not fending for my life. There’s no need to go without some luxuries. I just need to plan ahead and load up my tablet beforehand.

 

 

9. Pet

It’s going to be lonely out there so having a pet along for the ride might be nice. A dog would help defend me and cuddle up with me at night. If a dog isn’t available, I’ll take this attack bird:

 

10. Helicopter

When all else fails and humans are losing, I’m getting the heli out of Dodge. I’m going to find a deserted island and wait it out with Wilson.

Not that I know how to fly a helicopter, but it’ll come with an instruction manual, right? Right?

 

Bonus Choice:

Good luck – I’m going to need it because I’m no survivalist. I’ll probably end up eating some poisonous berries miles away from the nearest zombie threat, or I’ll end up tripping and falling with all of this stuff I’m carrying and a zombie will eat me.

What would you want during a zombie apocalypse? Or what would you want if you were trapped in a horror movie? Let me know in the comments or leave a link if you’ve already done something similar to this.

*I was not compensated for this post in any way. It was just for fun.

Blue Lily, Lily Blue

I received Blue Lily, Lily Blue by Maggie Stiefvater in the mail yesterday! I have been looking forward to this book since I found out it was being published. The Raven Cycle has been great so far, and I can’t wait to finish it.

Chad bought it for our anniversary, and I was so excited when I opened the mail and found it. The cover is beautiful. I mean look at it. The picture from Goodreads doesn’t do it enough justice.

Another great thing about pre-ordering this book is that Maggie signed a bookplate and drew a picture in it. You can click the picture on the right to get a better view. I actually wasn’t expecting the little doodle in there, but I think it’s really cool. She is an amazing artist.

I haven’t finished The Dream Thieves yet. I took a small break from it so I could work on my October reads, but I’m going to start reading it again in November. I’m about 140 pages in, and I’m loving it so far. It’s so creative and the writing is amazing. Everything just flows so nicely. I would highly recommend  this series.

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is new series that I want to start reading. This top ten will focus on recently published (around 1 to 2 years) series that I want to read. Of course there are tons of new series that I want to start, but I picked the ones I’m most excited to read. These are all published in 2013 or 2014, and they are in no particular order.

Written in Red by Anne Bishop (The Others) – I’ve heard some really great things about this series, and honestly, I’m not sure why I haven’t started it yet because I’ve been wanting to read it for a while.

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski (The Winner’s Trilogy) – I just bought this book, and I can’t wait to start reading it. I’ve heard good things about it, and it sounds like something I would enjoy.

A Thousand Pieces of You by Claudia Gray (Firebird) – The description sounds amazing, and the cover definitely caught my attention. It’s gorgeous, and I want to find out what happens with this story.

Not a Drop to Drink by Mindy McGinnis (Not a Drop to Drink) –  I really enjoy dystopian stories most of the time, and this one sounds pretty unique. I’m really interested to see where this books goes.

The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani (The School for Good and Evil) – I’m a big fan of anime, and for some reason this book reminds me of some of the shows I’ve watched, so I’m all for it. Obviously it won’t be like anime, but it sounds really intriguing.

The Program by Suzanne Young (The Program) – I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while now. I just need to either buy it or borrow it from the library. I’m sure I’ll end up buying it though.

Half a King by Joe Abercrombie (Shattered Sea) – This is another one that I have heard great things about. I want to be engrossed in another high fantasy story, and see how the main character is able to overcome his physical disabilities.

The Clockwork Scarab by Colleen Gleason (Stoker & Holmes) – Fictional relatives of a famous author and a detective come together to solve a mystery. This sounds amazing, and I want to know how the story plays out.

The Nightmare Affair by Mindee Arnett (The Arkwell Academy) – I’m interested to see where this goes. I’ve never read a book where the main character is a nightmare, so this should be fun.

Cursed by Lizzy Ford (Voodoo Nights) – I really love this cover. I know you shouldn’t judge a book that way, but it just looks so pretty, and the story sounds really good.

October 2014 Book Haul

Bookoutlet strikes again! I did make it a whole month and a half without buying any books, but I’m sure this haul made up for it. I got everything from Bookoutlet except for the last three books which I got at the book fair. Let me know if you’ve read any of these and what you thought or if you want to read any of them.

*All descriptions taken from Goodreads, and all pictures link to their respective Goodreads pages.

The Winner’s Curse – Marie Rutkoski
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Winning what you want may cost you everything you love

As a general’s daughter in a vast empire that revels in war and enslaves those it conquers, seventeen-year-old Kestrel has two choices: she can join the military or get married. But Kestrel has other intentions.

One day, she is startled to find a kindred spirit in a young slave up for auction. Arin’s eyes seem to defy everything and everyone. Following her instinct, Kestrel buys him—with unexpected consequences. It’s not long before she has to hide her growing love for Arin.

But he, too, has a secret, and Kestrel quickly learns that the price she paid for a fellow human is much higher than she ever could have imagined.

 

Split Second – Kasie West
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Life can change in a split second.

Addie hardly recognizes her life since her parents divorced. Her boyfriend used her. Her best friend betrayed her. She can’t believe this is the future she chose. On top of that, her ability is acting up. She’s always been able to Search the future when presented with a choice. Now she can manipulate and slow down time, too . . . but not without a price.

When Addie’s dad invites her to spend her winter break with him, she jumps at the chance to escape into the Norm world of Dallas, Texas. There she meets the handsome and achingly familiar Trevor. He’s a virtual stranger to her, so why does her heart do a funny flip every time she sees him? But after witnessing secrets that were supposed to stay hidden, Trevor quickly seems more suspicious of Addie than interested in her. And she has an inexplicable desire to change that.

Meanwhile, her best friend, Laila, has a secret of her own: she can restore Addie’s memories . . . once she learns how. But there are powerful people who don’t want to see this happen. Desperate, Laila tries to manipulate Connor, a brooding bad boy from school—but he seems to be the only boy in the Compound immune to her charms. And the only one who can help her.

As Addie and Laila frantically attempt to retrieve the lost memories, Addie must piece together a world she thought she knew before she loses the love she nearly forgot . . . and a future that could change everything.

 

Cruel Beauty – Rosamund Hodge
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Graceling meets Beauty and the Beast in this sweeping fantasy about one girl’s journey to fulfill her destiny and the monster who gets in her way-by stealing her heart.

Based on the classic fairy tale Beauty and the Beast, Cruel Beauty is a dazzling love story about our deepest desires and their power to change our destiny.

Since birth, Nyx has been betrothed to the evil ruler of her kingdom-all because of a foolish bargain struck by her father. And since birth, she has been in training to kill him.

With no choice but to fulfill her duty, Nyx resents her family for never trying to save her and hates herself for wanting to escape her fate. Still, on her seventeenth birthday, Nyx abandons everything she’s ever known to marry the all-powerful, immortal Ignifex. Her plan? Seduce him, destroy his enchanted castle, and break the nine-hundred-year-old curse he put on her people.

But Ignifex is not at all what Nyx expected. The strangely charming lord beguiles her, and his castle-a shifting maze of magical rooms-enthralls her.

As Nyx searches for a way to free her homeland by uncovering Ignifex’s secrets, she finds herself unwillingly drawn to him. Even if she could bring herself to love her sworn enemy, how can she refuse her duty to kill him? With time running out, Nyx must decide what is more important: the future of her kingdom, or the man she was never supposed to love.

 

The Hiding Place – David J. Bell
Genre – Mystery

Sometimes it’s easier to believe a lie.

Twenty-five-years ago, the disappearance of four-year-old Justin Manning rocked the small town of Dove Point, Ohio. After his body was found in a shallow grave in the woods two months later, the repercussions were felt for years.

Janet Manning has been haunted by the murder since the day she lost sight of her brother in the park. Now, with the twenty-fifth anniversary of Justin’s death looming, a detective and a newspaper reporter have started to ask questions, opening old wounds and raising new suspicions. Could the man convicted of the murder — who spent more than two decades in prison — really be innocent? Janet’s childhood friend and high school crush, who was in the park with her that day, has returned to Dove Point, where he is wrestling with his own conflicted memories of the events. And a strange man appears at Janet’s door in the middle of the night, claiming to know the truth.

Soon, years of deceit will be swept away, and the truth about what happened to Janet’s brother will be revealed. And the answers that Janet has sought may be found much closer to home than she ever could have imagined.

 

The Killing Hour – Paul Cleave
Genre – Thriller

“They come for me as I sleep. Their pale faces stare at me, their soft voices tell me to wake, to wake. They come to remind me of the night, to remind me of what I have done.”

Only Charlie doesn’t know what he has done. His shorts are covered in blood, there’s a bump on his forehead and on the news it says the two young women he was with the night before were brutally murdered. Charlie knows Cyris is the murderer – except the police don’t believe Cyris exists. Nor does Jo, Charlie’s ex-wife, to whom he goes for help. He desperately wants her to believe in him, and when she doesn’t, he knows he must force her. As Charlie goes on the run with Jo bound and gagged in the car boot, he tries to figure out whether Cyris is real or imagined, while the killing hour approaches yet again…

As gripping as his first powerful novel, THE CLEANER, this fantastic story keeps you guessing until the last page.

 

Friends with Boys – Faith Erin Hicks
Genre – Graphic Novel/Young Adult

After years of homeschooling, Maggie is starting high school. It’s pretty terrifying.

Maggie’s big brothers are there to watch her back, but ever since Mom left it just hasn’t been the same.

Besides her brothers, Maggie’s never had any real friends before. Lucy and Alistair don’t have lots of friends either. But they eat lunch with her at school and bring her along on their small-town adventures.

Missing mothers…distant brothers…high school…new friends… It’s a lot to deal with. But there’s just one more thing.

MAGGIE IS HAUNTED.

 

Don’t Turn Around – Michelle Gagnon
Genre – Young Adult/Mystery

In Michelle Gagnon’s debut YA thriller, Don’t Turn Around, computer hacker Noa Torson is as smart, tough, and complex as The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’s Lisbeth Salander.

The first in a trilogy, Don’t Turn Around’s intricate plot and heart-pounding action will leave readers desperate for book two.

Sixteen-year-old Noa has been a victim of the system ever since her parents died. Now living off the grid and trusting no one, she uses her hacking skills to stay anonymous and alone. But when she wakes up on a table in a warehouse with an IV in her arm and no memory of how she got there, Noa starts to wish she had someone on her side.

Enter Peter Gregory. A rich kid and the leader of a hacker alliance, Peter needs people with Noa’s talents on his team. Especially after a shady corporation threatens his life in no uncertain terms. But what Noa and Peter don’t realize is that Noa holds the key to a terrible secret, and there are those who’d stop at nothing to silence her for good.

 

Not a Drop to Drink – Mindy McGinnis
Genre – Young Adult/Science Fiction

Regret was for people with nothing to defend, people who had no water.

Lynn knows every threat to her pond: drought, a snowless winter, coyotes, and, most importantly, people looking for a drink. She makes sure anyone who comes near the pond leaves thirsty, or doesn’t leave at all.

Confident in her own abilities, Lynn has no use for the world beyond the nearby fields and forest. Having a life means dedicating it to survival, and the constant work of gathering wood and water. Having a pond requires the fortitude to protect it, something Mother taught her well during their quiet hours on the rooftop, rifles in hand.

But wisps of smoke on the horizon mean one thing: strangers. The mysterious footprints by the pond, nighttime threats, and gunshots make it all too clear Lynn has exactly what they want, and they won’t stop until they get it….

 

The Bad Beginning – Lemony Snicket
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

In this first book, readers are introduced to the unfortunate Baudelaire children — 14-year-old Violet, 12-year-old Klaus, and their infant sister, Sunny — when they learn they’ve just been orphaned by a terrible house fire.

The executor of the Baudelaire estate — a phlegm-plagued banker named Mr. Poe – sends the children to live with a distant relative: a conniving and dastardly villain named Count Olaf, who has designs on the Baudelaire fortune. Count Olaf uses the children as slave labor, provides horrid accommodations for them, and makes them cook huge meals for him and his acting troupe, a bunch of odd-looking, renegade good-for-nothings. When the children are commandeered to appear in Count Olaf’s new play, they grow suspicious and soon learn that the play is not the innocent performance it seems but rather a scheme cooked up by Olaf to help him gain control of the children’s millions.

All this bad luck does provide for both great fun and great learning opportunities, however. Violet is a budding McGyver whose inventions help the children in their quest, Klaus possesses a great deal of book smarts, and Sunny — whose only real ability is an incredibly strong bite — provides moral support and frequent comedy relief. Then there are the many amusing word definitions, colloquialisms, clichés, hackneyed phrases, and other snippets of language provided by the narrator (a character in his own right) that can’t help but expand readers’ vocabularies. Though the Baudelaire children suffer myriad hardships and setbacks, in the end they do manage to outsmart and expose Olaf’s devious ways. But of course, with luck like theirs, it’s a given that Olaf will escape and return to torment them again some day. If only misery was always this much fun.

 

Saving Francesca – Melina Marchetta
Genre – Young Adult/Contemporary

A compelling story of romance, family, and friendship with humor and heart, perfect for fans of Stephanie Perkins and Lauren Myracle.

Francesca is stuck at St. Sebastian’s, a boys’ school that pretends it’s coed by giving the girls their own bathroom. Her only female companions are an ultra-feminist, a rumored slut, and an impossibly dorky accordion player. The boys are no better, from Thomas, who specializes in musical burping, to Will, the perpetually frowning, smug moron that Francesca can’t seem to stop thinking about.

Then there’s Francesca’s mother, who always thinks she knows what’s best for Francesca—until she is suddenly stricken with acute depression, leaving Francesca lost, alone, and without an inkling of who she really is. Simultaneously humorous, poignant, and impossible to put down, this is the story of a girl who must summon the strength to save her family, her social life and—hardest of all—herself.

 

Wildwood Dancing – Juliet Marillier
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

High in the Transylvanian woods, at the castle Piscul Draculi, live five daughters and their doting father. It’s an idyllic life for Jena, the second eldest, who spends her time exploring the mysterious forest with her constant companion, a most unusual frog. But best by far is the castle’s hidden portal, known only to the sisters. Every Full Moon, they alone can pass through it into the enchanted world of the Other Kingdom. There they dance through the night with the fey creatures of this magical realm.

But their peace is shattered when Father falls ill and must go to the southern parts to recover, for that is when cousin Cezar arrives. Though he’s there to help the girls survive the brutal winter, Jena suspects he has darker motives in store. Meanwhile, Jena’s sister has fallen in love with a dangerous creature of the Other Kingdom—an impossible union it’s up to Jena to stop.

When Cezar’s grip of power begins to tighten, at stake is everything Jena loves: her home, her family, and the Other Kingdom she has come to cherish. To save her world, Jena will be tested in ways she can’t imagine—tests of trust, strength, and true love.

 

The Accidental Mother – Rowan Coleman
Genre – Fiction/Chick Lit.

Sophie and Carrie were childhood best friends, but in the last few years they’ve lost touch. While Carrie chose motherhood in a small town, Sophie is powering up the London career track. She’s a corporate manager poised for her next promotion. Sure, she doesn’t have much time for men, but she has a great shoe collection and a cat who’s never going to let her down.

And then Sophie is told that Carrie has died, with nobody left to care for her two daughters, Bella and Izzy, aged six and three. Their father, who left before Carrie’s death, is nowhere to be found; their grandmother is moving into assisted living. Sophie once promised Carrie she would take care of her children if the worst ever happened…and now that day has come.

Witty, wise, and filled with genuinely powerful emotion, The Accidental Mother is the heartwarming, heartbreaking story of a woman who is woefully under-equipped to be suddenly thrown into motherhood, but who through the eyes of two little girls learns more about loss, commitment, and true love than she had ever realized existed.

 

Danse Macabre – Stephen King
Genre – Horror/Non-Fiction

Stephen King explores the phenomenon of horror in a century of film, television, radio, and literature. Who better than King to investigate what terrifies his fans?

“One of the best books on American popular culture in the late 20th century.” (The Philadelphia Inquirer)

 

 

 

Pretties – Scott Westerfeld
Genre – Young Adult/Science Fiction

Tally has finally become pretty. Now her looks are beyond perfect, her clothes are awesome, her boyfriend is totally hot, and she’s completely popular. It’s everything she’s ever wanted.

But beneath all the fun — the nonstop parties, the high-tech luxury, the total freedom — is a nagging sense that something’s wrong. Something important. Then a message from Tally’s ugly past arrives. Reading it, Tally remembers what’s wrong with pretty life, and the fun stops cold.

Now she has to choose between fighting to forget what she knows and fighting for her life — because the authorities don’t intend to let anyone with this information survive.

 

Vampires: Back in Time to the First Darkness – The Original Stories – Watkins Publishing
Genre – Paranormal/Short Stories

Here come the creatures of the night, in eight timeless tales of horror that have terrified generations and inspired the recent flowering of vampire literature. Discover classics of the genre, such as John Polidori’s The Vampyre (written by Lord Byron’s physician) and Carmilla, the novella that inspired Bram Stoker’s Dracula and provoked a scandal with its lesbian undercurrent. This fascinating collection also features Johann Ludwig Tieck, Sheridan LeFanu, Guy de Maupssant, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (and his beloved detective, Sherlock Holmes), E.F. Benson, and Stoker himself, with “Dracula’s Guest”–believed to be the original first chapter of his novel, excised by the publisher.

 

Dragon’s Keep – Janet Lee Carey
Genre – Young Adult/Fantasy

Far away on Wilde Island, Princess Rosalind is born with a dragon claw where her ring finger should be. To hide this secret, the queen forces her to wear gloves at all times until a cure can be found, and Rosalind can fulfill the prophecy that will restore her family to its rightful throne. But Rosalind’s flaw cannot be separated from her fate. When she is carried off by the dragon, everything she thought she knew falls apart. . . .

 

 

Montmorency’s Revenge – Eleanor Updale
Genre – Young Adult/Historical Fiction

A dark tale of vengeance and madness takes Montmorency on his next crusade….

As Queen Victoria lies dying, Montmorency and his friends are already in mourning, and determined to track down the killers who have wrecked their lives. It’s personal obsession, but Montmorency has public duties too, and when the two collide, he must decide which comes first.
Can he stop Doctor Farcett’s slide into insanity? And how can he teach a new generation to forgive when the lust for revenge is eating away at his own soul?

The fourth Montmorency adventure takes him on a race across the globe with a mission of revenge for the death of his dearest friend Lord George Fox Selwyn.

 

Lies, Knives, and Girls in Red Dresses – Ron Koertge
Genre – Young Adult/Poetry

Yes it’s blue and Yes it tickles and Yes
he’s had a lot of wives
and nobody knows what happened to them

but he’s fun at the party and omigod
that castle!

Once upon a time, a strung-out match girl sold CDs to stoners. Twelve impetuous sisters escaped Daddy’s clutches to jiggle and cavort and wear out their shoes. Bluebeard’s latest wife discovered she’d married a serial killer. And Little Red Riding Hood confessed that she kind of wanted to know what it’s like to be swallowed whole.

You see, Ron Koertge knows what really happened to all those wolves and maidens, ogres and orphans, kings and piglets of fairy tales, and he knows about the Ever After. So come closer–he wants to whisper in your ear.

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is places books have made me want to visit. This can include places that are real or fictional. They’re listed in no particular order.

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (Battle School) – The biggest reason I would want to go to the Battle School is to experience the Battle Room. It’s laser tag without gravity. What could be cooler than that?

Harry Potter Series by J. K. Rowling (Hogwarts) – I want to see what the castle would be like. It seems like there is always something exciting going on and an adventure around every corner. However, I’ll be avoiding the Forbidden Forest. I can’t handle any giant spiders.

Vicious by V. E. Schwab (Merit) – I would mostly want to go to Merit because of the superpowers. There’s isn’t much memorable about the place, but it’s a world that has superpowers. I know I’m just visiting, but I’m taking my powers with me when I leave. Plus, I really need to meet Victor … for science, of course.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline (Oasis) – I need this in my life. Being the video game nerd that I am, I would love this virtual world. I’m sure I would never get anything done though, so maybe it’s a good thing it doesn’t exist.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Gatsby’s Mansion) – I want to go to a Gatsby party. I’m not normally an overly social person, but there ain’t no party like a Gatsby party.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Wonderland) – It’s seems like a crazy, fun place full of interesting characters. I want to meet the Cheshire Cat as well. If cats could talk, I feel like that is exactly how they would act.

The Archived by Victoria Schwab (The Archive) – The archive is described as “a place where the dead rest on shelves like books.” It would be interesting to see how everything is set up because it’s such a unique concept.

Dreams of the Dead by Thomas Randall (Japan) – While this is a horror story, I would still want to go to Japan based on how it’s described in this book. I’ve always wanted to go because I think Japanese culture is fascinating.

Pivot Point by Kasie West (Compound) – This is another place I want to go because of the powers they have. While I wont get any powers, it would be cool to see how everything operates. They probably won’t let me in though since I’m just a “Norm.” 😦

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins (Paris) – Another place I have always wanted to go. This book just made me want to go even more. It seems like a beautiful place.

July 2014 Wrap-Up

The wrap-ups are coming slowly but surely. I’m hoping to get August and September up sometime this month too, but we will see if that happens.

*All descriptions for books taken from Goodreads and all descriptions for movies taken from IMDb.

How Not to Write a Novel – Howard Mittelmark and Sandra Newman
Genre – Non-Fiction
My Rating – ★★★★

Many writing books offer sound advice on how to write well. This is not one of those books. On the contrary, this is a collection of terrible, awkward, and laughably unreadable excerpts that will teach you what to avoid—at all costs—if you ever want your novel published.

In How Not to Write a Novel, authors Howard Mittelmark and Sandra Newman distill their 30 years combined experience in teaching, editing, writing, and reviewing fiction to bring you real advice from the other side of the query letter. Rather than telling you how or what to write, they identify the 200 most common mistakes unconsciously made by writers and teach you to recognize, avoid, and amend them. With hilarious “mis-examples” to demonstrate each manuscript-mangling error, they’ll help you troubleshoot your beginnings and endings, bad guys, love interests, style, jokes, perspective, voice, and more. As funny as it is useful, this essential how-NOT-to guide will help you get your manuscript out of the slush pile and into the bookstore.

Review: How Not to Write a Novel is an interesting take on writing-advice books. I’ve always read books for what you are supposed to do, so it was nice to see what not to do when writing a novel. The advice in this book is helpful while being witty and funny. The authors give great examples of everything they discuss, and they do it in a humorous way to make it stand out. There might be some obvious examples of what not to do, but everything is useful, and it’s always nice to refresh yourself on what to avoid while writing. The book doesn’t tell you to write a specific way, it explains that certain areas in your book would improve if you didn’t add anything unnecessary. I feel like every potential author should read this book. Mainly to keep from making simple mistakes and to help engage future readers.

 

Saga, Volume 1 (Saga #1-6) – Brian K. Vaughan (Writer) and Fiona Staples (Illustrator)
Genre – Graphic Novel/Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★★

When two soldiers from opposite sides of a never-ending galactic war fall in love, they risk everything to bring a fragile new life into a dangerous old universe.

From New York Times bestselling writer Brian K. Vaughan (Y: The Last Man, Ex Machina) and critically acclaimed artist Fiona Staples (Mystery Society, North 40), Saga is the sweeping tale of one young family fighting to find their place in the worlds. Fantasy and science fiction are wed like never before in this sexy, subversive drama for adults.

This specially priced volume collects the first six issues of the smash-hit series The Onion A.V. Club calls “the emotional epic Hollywood wishes it could make.”

Review: Saga is such a great graphic novel. I knew I would like it, but I wasn’t prepared to love it as much as I did. It has an amazing story and characters. The characters are what make the story so intriguing. They are unique, and I found myself wanting to know more about all of them. I love that we were able to see different points of view throughout the story. The plot and characters in the story are unpredictable. I had no idea where the story was going to go next or what the characters were going to do, and I really enjoy that aspect in books and graphic novels. The illustrations are beautiful and make the story seem real. However, Saga is definitely for adults because of all the nudity and graphic violence. It’s an exciting and fun graphic novel, and I need to get my hands on the second volume soon.

 

The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
Genre – Classic/Historical Fiction
My Rating – ★★★

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new–something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

Review: The Great Gatsby is a story where the characters could possibly make it or break it with some readers. The characters are quite realistic but most of them are unlikeable. They each have their own flaws that make them believable and interesting. It did surprise me that there were some boring moments in this book even though the story is short. These moments include unnecessary names and information. At one point there is close to a page and a half of names of people attending Gatsby’s party. I know what Fitzgerald was trying to do with it, but it just seems unneeded to progress the story. However, I really enjoyed the ending. I thought it wrapped up the story well, and it was interesting to see how each character reacted to what happened. I would recommend this classic, but you might need to get used to the writing style.

 

Perfect Shadow – Brent Weeks
Genre – Novella/Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★

Discover the origins of Durzo Blint in this original novella set in the world of Brent Weeks’ New York Times bestselling Night Angel trilogy.

“I got a bit of prophecy,” the old assassin said. “Not enough to be useful, you know. Just glimpses. My wife dead, things like that to keep me up late at night. I had this vision that I was going to be killed by forty men, all at once. But now that you’re here, I see they’re all you. Durzo Blint.”

Durzo Blint? Gaelan had never even heard the name.

***
Gaelan Starfire is a farmer, happy to be a husband and a father; a careful, quiet, simple man. He’s also an immortal, peerless in the arts of war. Over the centuries, he’s worn many faces to hide his gift, but he is a man ill-fit for obscurity, and all too often he’s become a hero, his very names passing into legend: Acaelus Thorne, Yric the Black, Hrothan Steelbender, Tal Drakkan, Rebus Nimble.

But when Gaelan must take a job hunting down the world’s finest assassins for the beautiful courtesan-and-crimelord Gwinvere Kirena, what he finds may destroy everything he’s ever believed in.

Review: Perfect Shadow is a nice addition to The Night Angel Trilogy. It gives great backstory for Durzo and Mama K. You get to feel a better connection to why they act a certain way. There’s more of a connection with Durzo when you read this novella before The Way of Shadows because you know more about him once you start the trilogy. The story can be a bit confusing at first because it’s not entirely clear what is going on, but after a section or two, it’s easy to figure out what’s happening. I will warn anyone that reads this before the trilogy that he/she might get some of the twists ruined for him/her. This novella gives away some details that are supposed to be a surprise in the first book, so you’ll have to decide if you want to be spoiled or read this book after finishing The Way of Shadows.

 

The Way of Shadows – Brent Weeks
Genre – Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★★

From New York Times Bestselling author Brent Weeks…
For Durzo Blint, assassination is an art-and he is the city’s most accomplished artist.

For Azoth, survival is precarious. Something you never take for granted. As a guild rat, he’s grown up in the slums, and learned to judge people quickly – and to take risks. Risks like apprenticing himself to Durzo Blint.

But to be accepted, Azoth must turn his back on his old life and embrace a new identity and name. As Kylar Stern, he must learn to navigate the assassins’ world of dangerous politics and strange magics – and cultivate a flair for death.

Review: The Way of Shadows is a great fantasy. There are a lot of characters in this story, but each of them are memorable and stand out. I found myself really enjoying every different perspective and that’s good since there were quite a few of them. Even though there are lots of characters and points of view, there are no dull moments in the story. Everyone is important to the plot, and it’s interesting to see what each character is doing. One aspect I like about the characters is that no one is 100% good or evil. They’re a mix and a lot of the time their morals are questionable. It’s interesting to see how everyone reacts to one another. Durzo is, of course, my favorite character. I did enjoy the writing style and all of the action-filled plot. Something interesting is always going on to make you want to keep reading. The novel has a ton of twists and turns that make it even more awesome. I would highly recommend this book to anyone wanting an entertaining plot and characters.

 

Vicious – V.E. Schwab
Genre – Fantasy
My Rating – ★★★★★

A masterful, twisted tale of ambition, jealousy, betrayal, and superpowers, set in a near-future world.

Victor and Eli started out as college roommates—brilliant, arrogant, lonely boys who recognized the same sharpness and ambition in each other. In their senior year, a shared research interest in adrenaline, near-death experiences, and seemingly supernatural events reveals an intriguing possibility: that under the right conditions, someone could develop extraordinary abilities. But when their thesis moves from the academic to the experimental, things go horribly wrong. Ten years later, Victor breaks out of prison, determined to catch up to his old friend (now foe), aided by a young girl whose reserved nature obscures a stunning ability. Meanwhile, Eli is on a mission to eradicate every other super-powered person that he can find—aside from his sidekick, an enigmatic woman with an unbreakable will. Armed with terrible power on both sides, driven by the memory of betrayal and loss, the archnemeses have set a course for revenge—but who will be left alive at the end?

In Vicious, V. E. Schwab brings to life a gritty comic-book-style world in vivid prose: a world where gaining superpowers doesn’t automatically lead to heroism, and a time when allegiances are called into question.

Review: Vicious is another novel where the characters are not 100% good or evil. I love the idea that if someone were to get superpowers, it doesn’t mean that they will use it for good and that’s what makes this story so entertaining. They’re anti-heroes, and it’s not always clear who you should be rooting for. Each of them have their own selfish agenda they want to fulfill for one reason or another. I also love when there are no throwaway characters. If you were to take out any of the characters, the story wouldn’t be the same. Every character in this story is needed, and the characterization is really well-done. This story has a fantastic beginning and ending. The intro is memorable and really sucks you into the story from the start. The ending is the perfect ending for this type of novel because it sums everything up and makes sense for what was going on in the novel. Vicious is very character-oriented with an engaging story and world. I highly recommend this book! I want more from this world, and I hope there’s a sequel in the future for this story.

 


 

Waterworld
Rating – PG-13
My Rating – ★★★

In a future where the polar ice-caps have melted and Earth is almost entirely submerged, a mutated mariner fights starvation and outlaw “smokers,” and reluctantly helps a woman and a young girl try to find dry land.

Review: While Waterworld is far from being the best, it’s still an entertaining movie. The world is unique, and it’s easy to tell a lot of work went into the props and sets. That aspect is my favorite part of the movie. Just seeing the new inventions they created was pretty awesome. On the other hand, the characters and the plot could have been better. The characters are amusing and somewhat believable, but you don’t really get attached to them. It’s a fun story about an alternate future, but don’t expect it to be in your top five.

 

Wild America
Rating – PG
My Rating – ★★★

Three brothers – Marshall, Marty and Mark dream of becoming naturalists and portraying animal life of America. One summer their dream comes true, they travel through America, filming alligators, bears and moose.

Review: Wild America is a fun adventure story that’s full of surprises. The only reason this doesn’t get a higher star rating is because the ending is a little strange. Once the boys get to the scene with the bears everything starts to fall apart. The bears look extremely fake, and the way the situation is resolved seemed ridiculous. Chad and I ended up laughing during most of the ending. However, everything is believable up until that point, and it’s really enjoyable to watch.

 

The Great Gatsby (1974)
Rating – PG
My Rating – ★★★½

A Midwesterner becomes fascinated with his nouveau riche neighbor, who obsesses over his lost love.

Review: After reading the book, I wanted to watch one of the many film adaptations. We chose this one because it was the only one on Netflix at the time. It was nice to see the book come to life, and in some ways, the movie was better than the book. Some of the scenes were altered and seemed to make more sense. The acting was better than we expected, but there were some times it was a little off. Myrtle, for instance, seemed a bit more dramatic with everything than she did in the book. If you enjoyed the book, I  believe you will enjoy this movie as well because it tries to stay true to the source material.

*I have a post that explains what some of the rules/guidelines will be for my lists of favorite movies. I have two other favorite movie lists also (Hayao Miyazaki and Pixar).

This post will discuss my top 10 favorite zombie movies, and I thought it was fitting for the month of October. I’m not a fan of horror or gory movies because I’m easily startled and can get quite queasy at the sight of blood. However, I’ve seen a few zombie movies. I’ve been slowly exposing myself to movies and shows that contain some scary elements or gore because I’m tired of skipping out on good movies because I’m afraid of blood. Although, I still have limits, so the Saw series is a big no no for me.

I found my admiration for zombie films in college when I took a zombie class. Yes, a zombie class. It was titled Sociology of the Living Dead. I took it to mainly challenge myself with what I could handle in movies. The class went very well, and I was able to watch all of the movies for the most part. A lot of the movies in this list are ones that we watched in class, and I really enjoyed them.

TL/DR: Not a fan of horror or gore, but I still have some favorite zombie movies.

 

*All descriptions taken from IMDb.

Night of the Living Dead
Rating: Unrated

A group of people hide from bloodthirsty zombies in a farmhouse.

Thoughts: What list of favorite zombie movies would be complete without George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead? Maybe a lot, but not this list. This is the first movie we watched in my zombie class, and I really enjoyed it. It was a good movie to start with. It’s in black and white, so viewers can’t really see any blood, but there are plenty of intense moments and scary elements for a 1968 movie. With today’s standers for horror and gore, the movie can be kind of unintentionally funny at times but that doesn’t take away from its enjoyment. It’s definitely worth watching, especially if you want to start watching zombie movies because this is a great movie to begin with.

 

Dawn of the Dead
Rating: Unrated

Following an ever-growing epidemic of zombies that have risen from the dead, two Philadelphia SWAT team members, a traffic reporter, and his television-executive girlfriend seek refuge in a secluded shopping mall.

Thoughts: Dawn of the Dead is far more graphic than The Night of the Living Dead but still delivers a powerful message and a great story. I loved George Romero’s take on consumerism and how he represents it in this movie. It’s a clever way to show society’s need for material possessions by having zombies gather in and around a mall. I really enjoyed the ending of this one. While the ending of Night of the Living Dead is epic, I felt this ending fit well with Dawn of the Dead.

 

Dawn of the Dead
Rating: R

A nurse, a policeman, a young married couple, a salesman, and other survivors of a worldwide plague that is producing aggressive, flesh-eating zombies, take refuge in a mega Midwestern shopping mall.

Thoughts: The 2004 version of Dawn of the Dead is a remake of the original by George Romero. It’s directed by Zack Snyder, and he takes a different approach to zombies. While Romero’s zombies are slow and dangerous in large groups, Snyder’s zombies are fast and aggressive. I’m not sure which would be scarier to come in contact with, but I’d probably lean toward the fast zombies being more terrifying. At least you could have some strategy to get away from the slow ones and might have more time to think about a plan, but with the fast ones, you only have so much time to get away from them which leads to impulsive decisions and more fatalities. Zombies, in general, are pretty scary without any additional abilities. Adding breakneck speed to the list just seems unfair to humans. Even though I find Snyder’s zombies scarier, I like Romero’s zombies better.

 

Resident Evil
Rating: R

A special military unit fights a powerful, out-of-control supercomputer and hundreds of scientists who have mutated into flesh-eating creatures after a laboratory accident.

Thoughts: Resident Evil is not a fantastic movie and completely ventures away from the source material, but there’s something about it that’s entertaining. This is the first zombie movie I watched by myself when I was younger. Of course, it’s not as scary or gory as other movies, but it was a big accomplishment for me. I’m quite disappointed with the series though. I did like Resident Evil: Apocalypse, but I watched Resident Evil: Extinction and gave up on the following movies. It focuses more on how amazing Alice is instead of the threat of zombies. This is why I really enjoy Resident Evil. There’s a larger focus on zombies and the fear of not being able to escape them. This movie is a guilty pleasure of mine, and I love re-watching it.

 

Shaun of the Dead
Rating: R

A man decides to turn his moribund life around by winning back his ex-girlfriend, reconciling his relationship with his mother, and dealing with an entire community that has returned from the dead to eat the living.

Thoughts: Shaun of the Dead is a unique movie. It’s a zombie comedy that pays tribute to movies, video games, and television series. While it has some graphic scenes, it’s not as gory as other zombie movies. The movie is funny and clever with the way it presents the story and characters. It’s good to watch Dawn of the Dead before watching this movie because it’s fun to spot all of the references. After watching Romero’s zombie movies, I was able to fully enjoy the references that appear in Shaun of the Dead. Of course, you can watch Shaun of the Dead without seeing any of the others because it’s a great movie on it’s own.

 

Warm Bodies
Rating: PG-13

After a highly unusual zombie saves a still-living girl from an attack, the two form a relationship that sets in motion events that might transform the entire lifeless world.

Thoughts: This is definitely a different type of zombie movie than the previous ones mentioned. Warm Bodies is an interesting twist on zombies, and it’s entertaining to watch how these zombies differ from others. I love the commentary at the beginning when it pokes fun at humans being zombie-like because of technology. It’s interesting to see how this zombie romance story plays out. I never thought I would ever say that. While it’s not the best zombie movie, it’s a lot of fun to watch and see what happens to the characters.

 

28 Days Later
Rating: R

Four weeks after a mysterious, incurable virus spreads throughout the UK, a handful of survivors try to find sanctuary.

Thoughts: I know they’re considered infected and not zombies, but I feel like they have certain zombie aspects, so I’m including the movie on this list. 28 Days Later has an interesting filming style. It’s very dark and everything is quiet until zombies appear, which makes everything eerie. It makes the viewer feel like he/she is there with the characters while they try to survive. The opening scene is memorable, and it’s one of the few I still remember without watching it again. The characters are engaging, and it’s easy to root for them.

 

World War Z
Rating: PG-13

United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop the Zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments, and threatening to destroy humanity itself.

Thoughts: While this is not the best zombie movie and it goes far from the source material, it’s action-packed and just a fun summer blockbuster. The situations Gerry gets into are sort of ridiculous, and the fact that he somehow survives throughout the movie while others around him die is sort of humorous. However, if you can look past the silliness, it’s a lot of fun to watch. The ending is especially impressive and makes you want to be as awesome as Gerry seems to be. Plus, there’s no gore whatsoever in World War Z, so it’s a great way to introduce yourself to zombie movies.

 

I Am Legend
Rating: PG-13

Years after a plague kills most of humanity and transforms the rest into monsters, the sole survivor in New York City struggles valiantly to find a cure.

Thoughts: I know in the book, the infected are considered vampires, but I feel like in the movie they have elements of both vampires and zombies, so it’s in my list. I really enjoy Will Smith’s performance in this movie. He carries the entire movie, and I feel that takes some great acting skills and charisma. His character, Robert Neville, is portrayed well for a man surviving the zombie apocalypse by himself. Well he does have his dog, Sam, with him but still. The viewer can develop an emotional connection to the character and his dog. One scene in the movie might even make you tear up. I know I was extremely close to crying in the theater. I won’t say specifics because I don’t want to spoil anything for anyone who hasn’t seen it. Another movie without gore, but it’s still an intense movie experience. It’s definitely worth watching.

 

ParaNorman
Rating: PG

A misunderstood boy takes on ghosts, zombies and grown-ups to save his town from a centuries-old curse.

Thoughts: Of course this movie doesn’t have any gore, but that’s not surprising for a children’s movie. Even though it’s directed at children, it’s a great movie the whole family will enjoy. Lots of jokes for adults as well as kids. I was surprised by the social commentary, and I love how the town initially reacted to the zombie threat. It was amusing and made complete sense for the town who knew what zombies were and how to deal with them. This movie was a nice story on zombies and witches, and it was entertaining and refreshing to watch.

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s topic is books that are character driven. These are books that rely heavily on the characters to tell the story. Everyone’s interpretation of that may be different. These books are ones I felt best fit that description. They’re listed in no particular order. If you’ve done this Top Ten Tuesday, feel free to link your post in the comments, so I can check it out. 🙂

Vicious by V.E. Schwab – This book really stands out because of the characters. Each of them are essential, and I mean what’s not to love about anti-heroes and superpowers. Vicious is a new favorite of mine, and I’ve been trying to get everyone I know to read it.

The Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks – While the story is high fantasy, it’s driven by the characters. There are so many of them, but they each stand out. The characters and how they interact are some of the most memorable parts. The plot is great but watching the characters grow and develop is what really makes the story compelling.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – This is one book where the characters make it or break it for some readers. They’re realistic in the sense that they’re all flawed in their own way. The choices they make and how they handle themselves are the main focus of the novel.

The Murder Farm by Andrea Maria Schenkel – Told mostly through testimonies of the villagers, The Murder Farm relies entirely on it’s characters to tell the story. All the voices are unique and new characters are constantly introduced to propel the plot. Full Review

We Are the Goldens by Dana Reinhardt – The story is told through first-person, but Nell (the protagonist) speaks directly to the reader as if she is talking to her sister Layla. The relationship between the sisters is what drives the story and draws the reader in. Full Review

Overnight by Adele Griffin – A group of friends have a sleepover and one of them disappears. Everything that follows gets told through the alternating perspectives of several of the girls. Each of them are unique even if a bit cliche at times, but it’s how they each deal with the situation and how they react that tells the story.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness – The main character in this story deals with very serious issues, and it does get emotional. The focus of the story is on Conor and how he deals with everything happening in his life. He’s relatable in the sense that you can understand what he is going through and the emotions he’s feeling. Full Review

Black Box by Julie Schumacher – This story deals with a family struggling to help a member who is suffering from severe depression. The family has to learn how to understand what Dora is thinking and feeling, and at times, they find it very difficult. What makes this story stand out is that instead of the main character being the one who is suffering, it’s her sister. This allows the reader to see a side of the situation that isn’t usually shown. Full Review

Easy by Tammara Webber – A cute story about a girl and boy who fall in love while in college. They each have their own past to deal with before they can officially move on. The characters are believable, and they deal with some major issues over the course of the novel.

Shayla’s Double Brown Baby Blues by Lori Aurelia Williams – While there are a lot of sub-plots, all of them are character driven and focus on a certain aspect of each of the characters’ lives. Some of them are relatable, though others are not. They are all well-developed and make the story more believable. Full Review

NSFW Book Tag

The Not Safe For Work Tag was created by ChapterStackss and LukeLaneReads. I thought this tag would be really fun to do, so here we go!

The Questions:

1. What is the LAST book you would want your parents to walk in on you reading?

Savage Spawn: Reflections on Violent Children by Jonathan Kellerman
Genre – Non-Fiction/Psychology

I haven’t actually read this book yet, but the title and description are enough to raise a bunch of questions from my parents. I picture my mom walking in on me reading it and then slowly backing out of the room. I’m not in college anymore, and I don’t have any children, so it’s all the more concerning that I would be reading this book.

 

 

 

2. It’s storming outside, and you’re home alone for the night. What book would only make matters worse?

Tailypo
Genre – Folklore

Chad and I spent over an hour on the internet trying to find the exact version of this story that I heard as a child, but we were unsuccessful. There are many different versions of this folklore, and the majority of them are terrifying. A man takes a tail which belongs to a “creature” and eats the tail. The creature then haunts him over the next few nights, trying to get its tail back. One night it comes inside his cabin and climbs up over the foot of his bed saying, “tailypo . . . tailypo . . . give me back my tailypo.” In the version that I remember, the creature was roughly the size of an adult man, with a wolf face, bobcat ears, and really wanted its tail back . . .

I won’t be re-reading this anytime soon, especially if it’s storming outside.

 

3. Have you ever read a book simply because of the controversy surrounding it?

Not that I can recall. I don’t really seek out books because they’re controversial. I don’t avoid them. I just haven’t run into any that I would be interested in reading.

 

4. What is the most cringe-inducing romance or sex scene you have ever read?

A Fair Maiden by Joyce Carol Oates
Genre – Contemporary

** POSSIBLE SPOILER **

This entire book was cringeworthy. There were a few different scenes, but only one went into a lot of detail. Basically, the main character gets raped by someone who is supposed to be helping her seek revenge on someone else who raped her. It’s extremely sad. You feel really bad for her and it’s just awful. Just know what you’re getting into if you decide to read this book.

 

 

5. What book has made you question the author’s sanity?

It by Stephen King
Genre – Horror

An “eponymous being” disguises itself as a clown to eat children. As if we needed another reason to fear clowns. If that’s not enough to make you question his sanity, just read any of his other horror books . . . However, I still love Stephen King.  🙂

 

 

 

6. Have you ever put down a book and not finished it because the content was too much for you?

No, I haven’t. There are plenty of other reasons that will make me stop reading a story, but usually the content isn’t the deciding factor. Books that I normally put down are boring, have irritating characters, or a really poor plot. I try my best to read through everything, but sometimes it’s just too much, and I’d rather spend my time reading something I enjoy.

 

7. What fictional character do you have the most NSFW thoughts about?

Victor from Vicious by V. E. Schwab
Genre – Fantasy

Victor is very witty. I know he’s a sociopath, but there’s just something about him that makes him appealing. He knows how to get stuff done, and his power is extremely interesting to me. As someone who really likes psychology, Victor fascinates me.

 

 

8. Show us your most NSFW book cover (or drawing/photo inside a book).

Pleasure Prolonged by Cathryn Fox
Genre – Erotica

This is about as risque as it gets with my physical books. However, my tablet is another story because those books don’t count.  🙂

 

 

 

 

9. Have you ever read something from the erotica/romance genre, and what did you think?

Yes, it’s not bad. I even own a few. I haven’t found anything I really like though. If you have any recommendations, please let me know.

 

10. You stumble across a portkey. What fictional world would you NOT want to be transported into?

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Genre – Classic/Science Fiction

The world in Farenheit 451 is described as “post-literate” which means they’ve advanced to a point where reading and writing is thought of as unneeded and has been deemed illegal. Firemen literally burn books. What kind of world would be worse than that?!

You tell me, by doing this tag!

 

 

I tag anyone who would like to do this. If you do this tag or if you’ve already done it, leave a link in the comments, and I’ll be sure to check it out.